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Courses for Spring 2018

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
BENG 404-680 BEGINNING BENGALI II BANERJEE, SANJUKTA TR 0500PM-0700PM This course introduces students to colloquial Bengali. It gives equal emphasis to each of the four skills, reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Language will be studied in the context of socio-cultural aspects of West Bengal and Bangladesh. Besides lessons from the text, a major portion of the syllabus will be based on topics drawn from films, cultural events, festivals, food, and religion.
    BENG 434-680 AD BENGALI: POP CULTURE BANERJEE, HAIMANTI TR 0500PM-0630PM
      GUJR 403-680 BEGINNING GUJARATI II DESAI, RAKI MW 0500PM-0700PM During the first year of Gujarati, major emphasis is placed on acquiring phonetics, grammatical patterns, and basic vocabulary. These goals are accomplished through guided drills and conversations accompanied by formal instruction on Gujarati grammar. From the outset, students are also taught the Gujarati writing system, which is used for all materials. By the end of the first year of instruction, student should be able to carry on coherent conversations on selected topics, read simple texts and compose short pieces in Gujarati.
        GUJR 423-680 INTERMEDIATE GUJARATI II DESAI, RAKI MW 0700PM-0830PM
          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
          HIND 401-401 BEGINNING HINDI-URDU II PIEN, JOSHUA F 1100AM-1200PM
          TR 0900AM-1030AM
          This introductory course core proficiency in Hindi-Urdu up to the intermediate level. It is designed for students with little or no prior exposure to Hindi or Urdu. The course covers all four language skills (speaking, lsitening, reading, and writing) and all three models of communication (interpersonal, presentational, interpretive). Students will develop literacy skills in the primary script of their choice (Hindi or Urdu script). All written materials will be provided in both scripts. All meetings are interactive and students acquire the language by using it in realistic contexts. Culture is embedded in the activities and is also introduced through various authentic materials.
            HIND 421-301 INTERMEDIATE HINDI II: Intermediate Hindi Part II PIEN, JOSHUA TR 1030AM-1200PM In Intermediate Hindi the student continues to develop the four language skills, with an emphasis on real-life situations--through hearing and practicing conversation on everyday topics, reading a variety of authentic texts ranging from advertisements to short stories, watching segments of current films, and carrying out short research projects using Hindi sources. There is a strong emphasis on vocabulary development and on using contextually appropriate styles of spoken and written Hindi.
              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
              HIND 430-001 ADV HINDI LANG & LIT PIEN, JOSHUA TR 0130PM-0300PM Advanced Hindi aims at systematically developing higher level linguistic functions and cultural nuances. Students learn to describe, narrate and support opinions in informal and formal styles. The objective of the course is to promote a meaningful interaction with written literature and with native speakers in a socially acceptable manner in a variety of simple and complicated situations. A variety of authentic materials are used, such as short stories, plays, newspapers, magazines, videos, television and radio broadcasts, and interviews. Every semester the course materials and foci vary depending on the needs and interests of students in the class.
                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                HIND 500-001 BEG HIN/URD FOR GRADS SREENIVASAN, RAMYA TBA TBA- Beginning in the fall semester of 2014 Beginning Hindi and Beginning Urdu will be merged into a single course, Beginning Hindi-Urdu. At the beginning level spoken Urdu and Hindi are identical except for a few minor points. The broad outline of the course will thus remain the same as that of the current Beginning Hindi and Urdu courses. Students will learn to communicate with the language in a variety of everyday culturally authentic situations. Additional Urdu and Hindi culture will be integrated through authentic materials such as Bollywood film and music clips, and simple written texts. There will be equal emphasis on both scripts and cultures, and parallel written materials will be provided in both scripts. Students will be expected to develop first-year proficiency in one script of their choice, and will be encouraged to learn both. By merging the two courses students will be exposed to a broader range of linguistic and cultural styles, and students will thus have the opportunity to develop a deeper understanding that more closely resembles that of Hindi and Urdu native speakers. Please direct further inquiries to Josh Pien at jpien@sas.upenn.edu See schedule and classroom for HIND400/401
                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                  HIND 520-001 INTERMEDIATE HIND GRADS SREENIVASAN, RAMYA TBA TBA- In Intermediate Hindi the student continues to develop the four language skills, with an emphasis on real-life situations--through hearing and practicing conversation on everyday topics, reading a variety of authentic texts ranging from advertisements to short stories, watching segments of current films, and carrying out short research projects using Hindi sources. There is a strong emphasis on vocabulary development and on using contextually appropriate styles of spoken and written Hindi.
                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                    HIND 530-001 ADV HINDI FOR GRADS SREENIVASAN, RAMYA TBA TBA- Advanced Hindi aims at systematically developing higher level linguistic functions and cultural nuances. Students learn to describe, narrate and support opinions in informal and formal styles. The objective of the course is to promote a meaningful interaction with written literature and with native speakers in a socially acceptable manner in a variety of simple and complicated situations. A variety of authentic materials are used, such as short stories, plays, newspapers, magazines, videos, television and radio broadcasts, and interviews. Every semester the course materials and foci vary depending on the needs and interests of students in the class.
                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                      MLYM 409-680 BEGINNING MALAYALAM II KURICHI, JAMES TR 0600PM-0800PM This course is designed to develop skills in reading, writing, and speaking. It will focus on the alphabet, basic vocabulary, nouns (cases, gender and number), verbs and their basic tenses, numerals, rules of joining words, adjectives, adverbs, and sentence structure. Guided conversation will be a part of every class. Students will receive considerable training in speaking and writing their own sentences and paragraphs.
                        MLYM 429-680 INTERMEDIAT MALAYALAM II KURICHI, JAMES MW 0700PM-0830PM This course is designed to further the language skills learned in Beginning Malayalam. Direct and indirect speech, passive voice, postpositions, and rules of joining words, will be included. Reading and discussion of texts from current Malayalam literature (essays, narration, short stories, and poems) will be a major portion of the course.
                          PUNJ 405-680 BEGINNING PUNJABI II GAHUNIA, AMRIT TR 0430PM-0630PM This course emphasizes speaking and reading skills in Punjabi. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to interact meaningfully and in a socially acceptable manner in a variety of simple situations involving everyday conversational topics. Further, students should be able to read and understand the main idea and most details of simple connected texts. This course will utilize authentic printed, audio, and video materials and will provide opportunities for natural communication both within and outside the classroom.
                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                            PUNJ 425-680 INTERMEDIATE PUNJABI II GAHUNIA, AMRIT TR 0430PM-0600PM This course is designed as a continuation of Beginning Punjabi, but can also be taken by anyone who can demonstrate a similar level in proficiency of the language. The course objectives are to expand the mastery of sentence patterns and augment vocabulary and its usage through intensive grammar review and comprehension exercises. A special emphasis will also be placed on greater cultural awareness. Upon completion of this course students should be able to interact socially with added confidence and greater expressiveness. Students should also experience a great improvement in their comprehension of the spoken and written language.
                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                              SAST 001-601 INTRO TO MODERN INDIA ALI, DAUD T 0500PM-0800PM This introductory course will provide an outline of major events and themes in Indian history, from the Mughal Empire in the 16th century to the re-emergence of India as a global player in the 21st century. The course will discuss the following themes: society and economy in Mughal India; global trade between India and the West in the 17th century; the rise of the English East India Company's control over Indian subcontinent in the 18th century; its emergence and transformation of India into a colonial economy; social and religious reform movements in the 19th century; the emergence of elite and popular anti-colonial nationalisms; independence and the partition of the subcontinent; the emergence of the world's largest democracy; the making of an Indian middle class; and the nuclearization of South Asia.
                                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
                                SAST 003-401 HIST,CLTR, EARLY INDIA: HISTORY, CULTURE AND RELIGION IN EARLY INDIA ALI, DAUD TR 0300PM-0430PM This course surveys the culture, religion and history of India from 2500 BCE to 1200 CE. The course examines the major cultural, religious and social factors that shaped the course of early Indian history. The following themes will be covered: the rise and fall of Harappan civilization, the "Aryan Invasion" and Vedic India, the rise of cities, states and the religions of Buddhism and Jainism, the historical context of the growth of classical Hinduism, including the Mahabharata, Ramayana and the development of the theistic temple cults of Saivism and Vaisnavism, processes of medieval agrarian expansion and cultic incorporation as well as the spread of early Indian cultural ideas in Southeast Asia. In addition to assigned secondary readings students will read select primary sources on the history of religion and culture of early India, including Vedic and Buddhist texts, Puranas and medieval temple inscriptions. Major objectives of the course will be to draw attention to India's early cultural and religious past and to assess contemporary concerns and ideologies in influencing our understanding and representation of that past.
                                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
                                  SAST 004-401 INDIA'S LITERATURE: LOVE, WAR, WISDOM, AND HUMOR GOULDING, GREGORY MW 1000AM-1100AM This course introduces students to the extraordinary quality of literary production during the past four millennia of South Asian civilization. We will read texts in translation from all parts of South Asia up to the sixteenth century. We will read selections from hymns, lyric poems, epics, wisdom literature, plays, political works, and religious texts.
                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                    SAST 063-401 EAST&WEST:A HITCHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE MODERN WORLD MITCHELL, LISA MW 1100AM-1200PM Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered. From the role of spices in the formation of European joint stock companies circa 1600 to the contemporary cocaine trade, the course's use of both original primary sources and secondary readings written by historians and anthropologists will enable particular attention to the ways that global trade has impacted social, cultural, and political formations and practices throughout the world.
                                      Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                      SAST 105-001 BEGINNING TABLA II BHATTI, AQEEL MW 0500PM-0630PM A continuation of Tabla I, also open to beginning students.
                                        SAST 107-401 BEGINNING SITAR II MINER, ALLYN TR 0430PM-0600PM This is the second semester of a performance course in the North Indian sitar Students who have not taken the first semester but play any musical instrument are permitted to join. Principles of composition and improvisation will be explored in practice and supplemented by readings and listening. The class gives a group performance at the end of the semester.
                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                          SAST 120-401 LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH ASIAN CITY: SPACE, CULTURE, POLITICS GOULDING, GREGORY MW 0200PM-0330PM The South Asian city as a way of organizing space and social relations, as a symbol, as a memories the subject of this course. Through primarily, though by no means exclusively, readings of literature in translation, we will gain a sense for the history of the city and the ways in which it is a setting for protest and nostalgia, social transformation and solitary fl¿neurie. We will see reflections of the city in poetry recited in its homes, detective novels sold in its train stations, stories scribbled in its cafes, plays staged in its theaters, and films produced in its backlots. Readings will attempt to address urban spaces across South Asia, and will include works by writers such as Mirza Ghalib, Rabindranath Tagore, Saadat Hasan Manto, and Vijay Tendulkar. We will examine these works in the context of secondary readings, including histories and ethnological works that take up life in the modern city. Students will finish this course prepared to pursue projects dealing with the urban from multiple disciplinary perspectives. This course is suitable for anyone interested in the culture, society, or literature of South Asia, and assumes no background in South Asian languages.
                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                            SAST 142-401 INTRO BUDDHISM MCDANIEL, JUSTIN MW 0100PM-0200PM This course seeks to introduce students to the diversity of doctrines held and practices performed by Buddhists in Asia. By focusing on how specific beliefs and practices are tied to particular locations and particular times, we will be able to explore in detail the religious institutions, artistic, architectural, and musical traditions, textual production and legal and doctrinal developments of Buddhism over time and within its socio-historical context. Religion is never divorced from its place and its time. Furthermore, by geographically and historically grounding the study of these religions we will be able to examine how their individual ethic, cosmological and soteriological systems effect local history, economics, politics, and material culture. We will concentrate first on the person of the Buddha, his many biographies and how he has been followed and worshipped in a variety of ways from Lhasa, Tibet to Phrae, Thailand. From there we touch on the foundational teachings of the Buddha with an eye to how they have evolved and transformed over time. Finally, we focus on the practice of Buddhist ritual, magic and ethics in monasteries and among aly communities in Asia and even in the West. This section will confront the way Buddhists have thought of issues such as "Just-War," Women's Rights and Abortion. While no one quarter course could provide a detailed presentation of the beliefs and practices of Buddhism, my hope is that we will be able to look closely at certain aspects of these religions by focusing on how they are practiced in places like Nara, Japan or Vietnam, Laos.
                                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                              SAST 180-401 ASIAN AMERICAN FOOD KHAN, FARIHA TR 1200PM-0120PM You are what you eat. Asian American Food explores the history, politics, and ethnic identity of food through a cultural lens. Growing food, eating, and sharing meals serve as intimate expressions of self and community. By examining the production and consumption of food, the course investigates the ways that Asian Americans navigate traditions, gender norms, religious dietary laws, food habits, and employment as they create lives in the United States. The course overviews the history of Asian American foodways, but has a particular focus on Philadelphia's Asian American communities.
                                                CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                SAST 189-401 ISLAM AND THE WEST SEVEA, TERENJIT MW 0200PM-0330PM How did Muslims and modern South Asia interact with the West? What Islamic idioms, orientations and movements emerged in the nineteenth and twentienth centuries? Was South Asia a prominent global center of Islam? What kinds of Islamic educational institutions developed in modern South Asia? How did Muslims appropriate technologies? What materials were printed by Muslims? Were Muslims part of the British army? What was jihad in modernity? How did Muslim 'modernists' and 'traditionalists' respond to the challenges of colonialism and modernity? What was the nature of Sufism in modern South Asia? What was the nature of politicalIslam in South Asia? How did some Muslims demand a Muslim State? What was the Partition? How has Muslim history been remembered in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan? This is an introductory course, and aims to introduce students to a facet of the long history of Islam, Muslims, and the West.
                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                  SAST 200-401 INTRO TO ART IN S. ASIA GHOSH, PIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course is a survey of sculpture, painting and architecture in the Indian sub-continent from 2300 B.C., touching on the present. It attempts to explore the role of tradition in the broader history of art in India, but not to see India as 'traditional' or unchanging. The Indian sub-continent is the source for multi-cultural civilizations that have lasted and evolved for several thousand years. Its art is as rich and complex as that of Europe, and as diverse. This course attempts to introduce the full range of artistic production in India in relation to the multiple strands that have made the cultural fabric of the sub-continent so rich and long lasting.
                                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                                                    SAST 217-308 CU IN INDIA - TECH INNOVATION IN SOUTH ASIA/INDIA: HISTORY AND PRACTICE KUMAR, RASHMI T 0500PM-0700PM C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India or South East Asia where students participate in 1) 28 classrom hours in the Fall term 2) a 12-day trip to India or South East Asia with the instructor during the winter break visiting key sites and conducting original research (sites vary) 3) 21 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) a research paper, due at the end of the Spring term. Course enrollment is limited to students admitted to the program. For more information and the program application go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course DEADLINE TO REGISTER IS MARCH 31st
                                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                      SAST 217-404 CU IN INDIA: CU IN S.EAST ASIA: SUFIS AND GODS, TEMPLES AND SHRINES OF S.EAST ASIA SEVEA, TERENJIT M 0330PM-0600PM C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India or South East Asia where students participate in 1) 28 classrom hours in the Fall term 2) a 12-day trip to India or South East Asia with the instructor during the winter break visiting key sites and conducting original research (sites vary) 3) 21 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) a research paper, due at the end of the Spring term. Course enrollment is limited to students admitted to the program. For more information and the program application go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course DEADLINE TO REGISTER IS MARCH 31st
                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                        SAST 217-407 CU IN INDIA: THE PERFORMING ARTS OF MODERN SOUTH INDIA SONEJI, DAVESH T 0430PM-0600PM C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India or South East Asia where students participate in 1) 28 classrom hours in the Fall term 2) a 12-day trip to India or South East Asia with the instructor during the winter break visiting key sites and conducting original research (sites vary) 3) 21 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) a research paper, due at the end of the Spring term. Course enrollment is limited to students admitted to the program. For more information and the program application go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course DEADLINE TO REGISTER IS MARCH 31st
                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                          SAST 223-401 WORDS ARE WEAPONS: PROTESTS AND POLITICAL ACTIVISM IN SOUTH ASIAN LITERATURE MOHAMMAD, MAHBOOB TR 0130PM-0300PM This course focuses on the key themes of protest and resistance in contemporary South Asian literarure. Most South Asian countries have been witnessing an endless wave of protests and resistance from various sections of public life for the last three decades. In India, for example, protest literature emerges not only from traditionally marginalized groups (the poor, religious and ethnic minorities, depressed castes and tribal communities), but also from upper-caste groups, whose protest literature expresses concerns over economic oppression, violence and the denial of fundamental rights. Literature is becoming an immediate tool to articualte acts of resistance and anger, as many writers and poets are also taking on new roles as poitical activists. In this class, we will read various contemporary works of short fiction, poetry and memoirs to comprehend shifts in public life toward political and social activism in South Asia. We will also watch two or three documentaries that focus on public protests and resistance. No pre-requisites or South Asian language requirements. All literary works will be read in English translations.
                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                            SAST 255-401 MEDIA AND RELIGION ROBB, MEGAN TR 0300PM-0430PM Religion and communications media have been inextricable for millenia. This course will look at the ways that religion intersects with media-- exploring how the media is the message. The class begins with an overview of the evolution of religion and media in the West and in the Global South. Then we turn to four different contemporary contexts- American, British, Indian, and Pakistani-- to understand how news media has gone about the business of turning religion into news. The class will familiarize students with a variety of media forms-- including traditional architecture, devotional texts, devotional poetry, music, visual-sensorial worship, modern film, recorded msuic, clothing, and live performance. We will conclude with a look at religion in other formsof contemporary media, with particular attention to new media (TV, radio and the internet). There will be guest speakers and a visit to the Penn Museum. While much of the course will be immersed in the history and the past, we will conclude by considering contemporary contexts, both globalized and local. There is no prerequisite for the course. All students are welcome.
                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                              SAST 295-401 WOMEN IN MODERN S. ASIA SREENIVASAN, RAMYA TR 0300PM-0430PM This course on women in modern South Asian history has three objectives: 1.To gain an understanding of evolving institutions and practices shaping women's lives: especially the family, law, and religious traditions. 2. To understand the impact of historical processes-- the formation and breakdown of empire, colonialism, nationalism, and decolonization--upon South Asian women between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries. 3. To aquaint ourselves with the historiography on South Asian women. We will read primary sources, as well as familiarize ourselves with the histiorgraphy of women, religion, and colonial modernity in South Asia.
                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                SAST 297-401 NATURE CULTURE ENVIRONMENTALISM: URBAN WATER ANAND, NIKHIL TR 1030AM-1200PM In Spring 2018, this course is specially designed to appeal to students with interests in urban studies and environmental studies across different disciplines. We will explore the natures, cultures and environmentalisms of cities by exploring the matter of urban water. Cities have long been made through historic projects to tame the unruly relations between land and water. As the catastrophic human disasters in Houston, Florida and Puerto Rico have recently shown, these relations are today everywhere being unsettled and exacerbated by climate change. In cities as diverse as Philadelphia and Mumbai, climate change promises to exacerbate social inequalities and further squeeze non-human natures. How is the urban environment produced, magnified, divided and shrunk with water? In these times, how might we make space for social justice and non-human natures in and along rising urban waters?
                                                                  BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                  SAST 323-401 THE LITERATURE & HISTORIOGRAPHY OF NATIONAL TRAUMA: PARTITION & SOUTH ASIA KAUL, SUVIR W 0200PM-0500PM This course explores an aspect of Postcolonial literature intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                                                                    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                    SAST 405-680 BEGINNING PASHTU I MW 0500PM-0700PM
                                                                      SAST 406-680 BEGINNING PASHTU II CANCELED
                                                                        SAST 411-680 BEGINNING MARATHI II RANADE, MILIND TR 0600PM-0800PM
                                                                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                          SAST 413-680 INTERMEDIATE MARATHI II RANADE, MILIND TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                            SAST 426-680 INTERMEDIATE PASHTU II MW 0700PM-0830PM
                                                                              PRIOR LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                              SAST 447-680 ADVC KANNADA: TPCS RALLAPALLI, SUNDARAM TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                                                                SAST 500-401 INTRO TO ART IN S. ASIA GHOSH, PIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course is a survey of sculpture, painting and architecture in the Indian sub-continent from 2300 B.C., touching on the present. It attempts to explore the role of tradition in the broader history of art in India, but not to see India as 'traditional' or unchanging. The Indian sub-continent is the source for multi-cultural civilizations that have lasted and evolved for several thousand years. Its art is as rich and complex as that of Europe, as diverse. This course attempts to introduce the full range of artistic production in India in relation to the multiple strands that have made the cultural fabric of the sub-continent so rich and long lasting.
                                                                                  SAST 517-404 CU IN INDIA: CU IN S.EAST ASIA: SUFIS AND GODS, TEMPLES AND SHRINES OF S.EAST ASIA SEVEA, TERENJIT M 0330PM-0600PM C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India. The 2-CU course requires: 1) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Fall term 2) A 12-Day trip to India with the instrucotrduring the winter break to visit key sites and conduct original research (sites vary) 3) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) A research paper, due at the end of the spring term. Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the program. For more information, and the program application, go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course
                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                    SAST 517-405 CU IN INDIA: CU IN INDIA: LIVING TRADITIONS OF INDIAN LITERATURE CANCELED C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India. The 2-CU course requires: 1) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Fall term 2) A 12-Day trip to India with the instrucotrduring the winter break to visit key sites and conduct original research (sites vary) 3) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) A research paper, due at the end of the spring term. Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the program. For more information, and the program application, go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course
                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                      SAST 517-407 CU IN INDIA: THE PERFORMING ARTS OF MODERN SOUTH INDIA SONEJI, DAVESH T 0430PM-0600PM C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India. The 2-CU course requires: 1) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Fall term 2) A 12-Day trip to India with the instrucotrduring the winter break to visit key sites and conduct original research (sites vary) 3) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) A research paper, due at the end of the spring term. Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the program. For more information, and the program application, go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course
                                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                        SAST 523-401 WORDS ARE WEAPONS: PROTESTS AND POLITICAL ACTIVISM IN SOUTH ASIAN LITERATURE MOHAMMAD, MAHBOOB TR 0130PM-0300PM This course focuses on the key themes of protest and resistance in contemporary South Asian literarure. Most South Asian countries have been witnessing an endless wave of protests and resistance from various sections of public life for the last three decades. In India, for example, protest literature emerges not only from traditionally marginalized groups (the poor, religious and ethnic minorities, depressed castes and tribal communities), but also from upper-caste groups, whose protest literature expresses concerns over economic oppression, violence and the denial of fundamental rights. Literature is becoming an immediate tool to articualte acts of resistance and anger, as many writers and poets are also taking on new roles as poitical activists. In this class, we will read various contemporary works of short fiction, poetry and memoirs to comprehend shifts in public life toward political and social activism in South Asia. We will also watch two or three documentaries that focus on public protests and resistance. No pre-requisites or South Asian language requirements. All literary works will be read in English translations.
                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                          SAST 549-401 SUFISM ELIAS, JAMAL R 0130PM-0430PM This course is an intensive survey of the rich variety of Islamic intellectual, literary and cultural phenomena subsumed under the term Sufism. Sufi philosophies, liturgical practices, and social organizations have been a major part of the Islamic tradition in all historical periods, and Sufism has also served as a primary muse behind Islamic aesthetic expression in poetry, music, and the visual arts. In this course, we will explore the various significations of Sufism by addressing both the world of ideas and socio-cultural practices. The course is divided into three broad sections: central themes and concepts going back to the earliest individuals who identified themselves as Sufis; Sufi metaphysics and epistemology as exemplified in the work of Ibn al-'Arabi and his school, and literary expressions as exemplified in the epic poem Layla and Majnun by Nizami, The Conference of the Birds by Attar, and in the life and poetry of Mawlana Jalaluddin Rumi. In studying this material, we will be concerned equally with establishing common patterns and seeing how being a Sufi has meant different things to various people over the course of history.
                                                                                            SAST 558-401 MONUMENT, MEMORY, AND PLACE IN SOUTH ASIA LYCETT, MARK TR 1030AM-1200PM Drawing on the archaeology and landscape history of South Asia, this seminar explores place-making and social geographies as they play out through a series of inter-related themes: situated history, embodiment, monumentality, social memory, and appropriation. We consider approaches to site, monument, and image as experienced and construed through audience, circumstance, and politics; and how these conditions both inform and transform the meaningful construction of place, commemoration, and heritage. This discussion sets the stage for a broader consideration of the politics of heritage in contemporary South Asia.
                                                                                              SAST 625-301 PHILOLOGY AND HISTORY: READING SOUTH ASIAN TEXTS SREENIVASAN, RAMYA M 0200PM-0500PM
                                                                                                SAST 629-401 MONEY, MARKETS, AND MUTUALITY MITCHELL, LISA T 0130PM-0430PM This course examines intersections of the fiscal and the social, paying parti- cular attention to informal sectors in the urban and urbanizing global South. Drawing from recent ethnographic and historical work on informal networks of credit, banking, and other financial arrangements, the course will examine the roles of rotating credit associations, financial self-help groups, direct cash payments, informal insurance networks, intersections of socio-cultural identi- ties (caste, ethnicity, shared origins or educational background) with credit networks, locally embedded understandings of creditworthiness that may be grounded in social rather than economic capital, and informal mechanisms for the movement of credit and debt across spaces and communities, both historica- lly and in the present. Permit required to register--please contact the instructor.
                                                                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                  SAST 632-401 HINDUISM&COLONIAL MDRNTY: HINDUISM AND COLONIAL MODERNITY SONEJI, DAVESH R 0130PM-0430PM This seminar deals with the question of modernity in South Asia, with a specific focus on the construction, dissemination, and politicization of Hinduism in nineteenth and twentieth century India. It focuses on three central heuristic lenses--namely those of European imperialism, Orientalism, and nationalism--to study modernity and its discontents. What was at stake in the encounter between colonial modernity and India's religions in nineteenth and early twentieth centuries? How did colonial and native discourses on "reform" and "revival" shape Indian religions as we understand them today? How is modern "Hinduism" inextricably hinged to early forms of cultural transnationalism, Orientalism, and incipient forms of nationalism? This seminar approaches questions such as these and others, with an eye to understanding how nineteenth and early twentieth century discourses continue to shape contemporary understandings of Hinduism in deep and highly politicized ways.
                                                                                                    SAST 648-401 18TH CENTURY LIT: LAND/LABOUR/LIT/18TH-C KAUL, SUVIR T 0600PM-0900PM This course varies in its emphases, but in recent years has explored the theory of narrative both from the point of view of eighteenth-century novelists and thinkers as well as from the perspective of contemporary theory. Specific attention is paid to issues of class, gender, and ideology. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.
                                                                                                      SAST 701-301 METHODOLOGY SEMINAR: METHODS AND APPROACHES FOR STUDYING SOUTH ASIA PATEL, DEVEN T 0300PM-0600PM Topics vary
                                                                                                        SKRT 461-301 SANSKRIT 1ST YR PART II PATEL, DEVEN MWF 1100AM-1200PM During the first semester of beginning Sanskrit, students will be introduced to the script, phonetics, and grammar of the Sanskrit language. By the end of the semester they will be able to begin to read Sanskrit texts and compose Sanskrit sentences in addition to carrying out simple conversation. They will build the requisite skills to read, by the second semester, simple inscriptions and sections from texts like the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Bhagavad Gita, Pancatantra, and Yoga Sutra. Students will also be introduced to many features of Sanskrit culture.
                                                                                                          SKRT 471-301 INTERMEDIATE SANSKRIT II ALI, DAUD TR 1200PM-0130PM This course will lead students to consolidate their knowledge of Sanskrit grammar and increase their familiarity with Sanskrit literature of all kinds, including epic, literary, philosophical, and narrative genres of texts. It will also introduce students to the study and reading of inscriptional materials.
                                                                                                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                            SKRT 480-301 READINGS IN SANKRIT LIT RALLAPALLI, SUNDARAM M 0200PM-0500PM This course is for advanced students of Sanskrit. Designed as a seminar, the course aims to take students through the primary and secondary sources of Sanskrit literary and phlosophical production. Each semester will focus on a different genre: epic, belles-lettres, lyric poetry, drama, philosophy, shastra, advanced grammar, history, poetics, and epigraphy. We will focus on original sources, secondary scholarship, and theoretical approaches toward the translation and study of Sanskrit texts.
                                                                                                              TAML 407-680 BEGINNING TAMIL II RENGANATHAN, VASU MW 0500PM-0700PM This course introduces students to colloquial Tamil and formal written Tamil. A balance between production skills, viz. writing and speaking, and comprehension skills, viz. reading and listening, will be maintained throughout the course. Reading materials will introduce students to customs and habits of the Tamil speakers in Tamil Nadu, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and Singapore. Lessons in the class will be based on a set of Tamil learning software made available at the MMETS Server. This software will be customized to the needs of students.
                                                                                                                TAML 427-680 INTERMEDIATE TAMIL II RENGANATHAN, VASU TR 0500PM-0630PM This course develops the skills obtained either from the Beginning Tamil course or from students' prior exposure to Tamil. The emphasis will be on using the language in actual environments both in spoken medium and in written medium. Multimedia materials such as audio and video facilities will be used extensively to provide students an exposure to the Tamil culture and customs. Besides improving their speech and writing, students will also be introduced gradually to Tamil literature, which has two thousand years of literary history. The learning process in this course will be facilitated by appropriate software equipped with multimedia facilities.
                                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                  TAML 446-680 ADVANCED TAMIL RENGANATHAN, VASU TR 0630PM-0800PM
                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                    TAML 489-301 READINGS CLASSICAL TAMIL RENGANATHAN, VASU TBA TBA-
                                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                      TELU 410-001 BEGINNING TELEGU II MOHAMMAD, MAHBOOB MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                        TELU 430-001 INTERMDIATE TELUGU II MOHAMMAD, MAHBOOB MW 0200PM-0330PM This course is designed to expand the students' basic language skills in Telugu in order to allow them to function adequately in a Telugu-speaking environment, to immerse themselves in the rich Andhra culture, and to accomplish a more advanced competency in an interesting foreign language. This course is also aimed at students planning to conduct scholarly research in Telugu history, literature or society, or humanities or social science fieldwork in Telugu speaking areas.
                                                                                                                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                          URDU 402-401 BEGINNING HINDI-URDU II PIEN, JOSHUA F 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                                                                          TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                                                          This introductory course core proficiency in Hindi-Urdu up to the intermediate level. It is designed for students with little or no prior exposure to Hindi or Urdu. The course covers all four language skills (speaking, lsitening, reading, and writing) and all three models of communication (interpersonal, presentational, interpretive). Students will develop literacy skills in the primary script of their choice (Hindi or Urdu script). All written materials will be provided in both scripts. All meetings are interactive and students acquire the language by using it in realistic contexts. Culture is embedded in the activities and is also introduced through various authentic materials.
                                                                                                                            URDU 422-401 INTERMEDIATE URDU II MENAI, MUSTAFA TR 0130PM-0300PM This continuing second-year course allows students to continue improving their Urdu proficiency while also gaining a broad foundational understanding of Urdu society and culture throughout South Asia. The course provides students the tools needed to handle a variety of authentic written and spoken Urdu sources including film, music, media reports, folk tales, and simple literature. Students will also continue to increase their speaking and writing proficiency to be able to discuss a broad range of concrete, real-world topics. The course is designed for students with one year of previous Urdu or Hindi study or the equivalent proficiency.
                                                                                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                              URDU 431-401 LANGUAGE & LITERATURE: Advanced Urdu-Language and Literature MENAI, MUSTAFA TR 0300PM-0430PM This course is designed to give in-depth exposure to some of the finest works of classical and modern Urdu prose and poetry along with the historical and socio-political trends they represent. Figures covered range from Ghalib (b.1797) to Faiz, Fehmida Riaz, and post 9/11 Urdu prose and poetry. The course is open to both undergraduates and graduate students, subject to having intermediate level proficiency. The course is repeatable, and hte content changes every semester. Multi-media content such as music, videos, blogs etc. will be actively incorporated. Every effort will be made to accommidate individual interests. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor with any questions, or if they are unsure about eligibility.
                                                                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                URDU 462-301 SUFISM AND RESISTANCE: Lit in Translation-Sufism and Resistance MENAI, MUSTAFA TR 1030AM-1200PM