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SOUTH ASIA STUDIES courses for Spring 2015

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
SAST 001-401 Introduction to Modern India SEVEA, TERENJIT PSYCHOLOGY LAB A30 TR 1030AM-1200PM This introductory course will provide an outline of major events and themes in Indian history, from the Mughal Empire in the 16th century to the re-emergence of India as a global player in the 21st century. The course will discuss the following themes: society and economy in Mughal India; global trade between India and the West in the 17th century; the rise of the English East India Company's control over Indian subcontinent in the 18th century; its emergence and transformation of India into a colonial economy; social and religious reform movements in the 19th century; the emergence of elite and popular anti-colonial nationalisms; independence and the partition of the subcontinent; the emergence of the world's largest democracy; the making of an Indian middle class; and the nuclearization of South Asia.
  • HIST089401
History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
SAST 003-401 HIST,CLTR, EARLY INDIA: History, Culture and Religion in Early India ALI, DAUD WILLIAMS HALL 205 TR 0900AM-1030AM This course surveys the culture, religion and history of India from 2500 BCE to 1200 CE. The course examines the major cultural, religious and social factors that shaped the course of early Indian history. The following themes will be covered: the rise and fall of Harappan civilization, the "Aryan Invasion" and Vedic India, the rise of cities, states and the religions of Buddhism and Jainism, the historical context of the growth of classical Hinduism, including the Mahabharata, Ramayana and the development of the theistic temple cults of Saivism and Vaisnavism, processes of medieval agrarian expansion and cultic incorporation as well as the spread of early Indian cultural ideas in Southeast Asia. In addition to assigned secondary readings students will read select primary sources on the history of religion and culture of early India, including Vedic and Buddhist texts, Puranas and medieval temple inscriptions. Major objectives of the course will be to draw attention to India's early cultural and religious past and to assess contemporary concerns and ideologies in influencing our understanding and representation of that past.
  • HIST086401
History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
SAST 004-401 INDIA'S LITERATURE PATEL, DEVEN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A5 MW 1100AM-1200PM This course introduces students to the extraordinary quality of literary production during the past four millennia of South Asian civilization. We will read texts in translation from all parts of South Asia up to the sixteenth century. We will read selections from hymns, lyric poems, epics, wisdom literature, plays, political works, and religious texts.
  • COML005401
Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
SAST 063-401 EAST/WEST:MDRN WRLD HIST MITCHELL, LISA CANCELED Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered. From the role of spices in the formation of European joint stock companies circa 1600 to the contemporary cocaine trade, the course's use of both original primary sources and secondary readings written by historians and anthropologists will enable particular attention to the ways that global trade has impacted social, cultural, and political formations and practices throughout the world.
    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
    SAST 105-001 BEGINNING TABLA II BHATTI, AQEEL WILLIAMS HALL 812 MW 0500PM-0630PM A continuation of Tabla I, also open to beginning students.
      SAST 107-401 BEGINNING SITAR II MINER, ALLYN WILLIAMS HALL 812 TR 0430PM-0600PM This is the second semester of a performance course in the North Indian sitar Students who have not taken the first semester but play any musical instrument are permitted to join. Principles of composition and improvisation will be explored in practice and supplemented by readings and listening. The class gives a group performance at the end of the semester.
      • MUSC063401
      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      SAST 109-401 INTERMEDIATE SITAR II MINER, ALLYN WILLIAMS HALL 812 MW 0330PM-0500PM This is a continuation of an intermediate performance course in the North Indian sitar. It is open to students by permission of the instructor. Students who play other instruments and have had at least a beginning level of training in Hindustani music may also join, with the permission of the instructor.
      • MUSC162401
      SAST 116-401 MUSIC CULT N INDIA & PAK: Musical Cultures of North India and Pakistan MINER, ALLYN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 0130PM-0300PM A great variety of song and instrumental genres have thrived in the Hindu and Muslim milieus of North India and Pakistan. In this course we examine a selection of urban and rural musics, such as instrumental music in Baluchistan, qawwali in Delhi, the garba of Gujarat, ballad singing of Rajasthan and the urban music of Calcutta. We will explore the sounds, poetry, historical, and social contexts of chosen genres and trace aspects of continuity and adaptation in the changing environment of contemporary South Asia. Readings are supplemented by audio-visual material and live performances.
      • MUSC266401
      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      SAST 124-401 NARRAT ACROSS CULTURES: Narrative Across Cultures ALLEN, ROGER ARTS, RSRCH & CULTR - 3601 LO 208 W 0200PM-0500PM The purpose of this course is to present a variety of narrative genres and to discuss and illustrate the modes whereby they can be analyzed. We will be looking at shorter types of narrative: short stories, novellas, and fables, and also some extracts from longer works such as autobiographies. While some works will come from the Anglo-American tradition, a larger number will be selected from European and non-Western cultural traditions and from earlier time-periods. The course will thus offer ample opportunity for the exploration of the translation of cultural values in a comparative perspective.
      • COML125401
      • ENGL103401
      • FOLK125401
      • NELC180401
      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
      SAST 142-401 INTRO BUDDHISM MCDANIEL, JUSTIN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 402 MW 0100PM-0200PM This course seeks to introduce students to the diversity of doctrines held and practices performed by Buddhists in Asia. By focusing on how specific beliefs and practices are tied to particular locations and particular times, we will be able to explore in detail the religious institutions, artistic, architectural, and musical traditions, textual production and legal and doctrinal developments of Buddhism over time and within its socio-historical context. Religion is never divorced from its place and its time. Furthermore, by geographically and historically grounding the study of these religions we will be able to examine how their individual ethic, cosmological and soteriological systems effect local history, economics, politics, and material culture. We will concentrate first on the person of the Buddha, his many biographies and how he has been followed and worshipped in a variety of ways from Lhasa, Tibet to Phrae, Thailand. From there we touch on the foundational teachings of the Buddha with an eye to how they have evolved and transformed over time. Finally, we focus on the practice of Buddhist ritual, magic and ethics in monasteries and among aly communities in Asia and even in the West. This section will confront the way Buddhists have thought of issues such as "Just-War," Women's Rights and Abortion. While no one quarter course could provide a detailed presentation of the beliefs and practices of Buddhism, my hope is that we will be able to look closely at certain aspects of these religions by focusing on how they are practiced in places like Nara, Japan or Vietnam, Laos.
      • EALC015401
      • RELS173401
      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      SAST 150-050 INTRODUCTION TO INDIAN THOUGHT This course will take the student through the major topics of Indian philosophy by first introducing the fundamental concepts and terms that are necessary for a deeper understanding of themes that pervade the philosophical literature of India -- arguments for and against the existence of God, for example, the ontological status of external objects, the means of valid knowledge, standardsof proof, the discourse on the aims of life. The readings will emphasize classical Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain philosophical articulations (from 700 B.C.Eto 16th century CE) but we will also supplement our study of these materials with contemporary or relatively recent philosophical writings in modern India.
        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; STUDY ABROAD
        SAST 165-301 MASALA MATTERS: MASALA MATTERS: A CULINARY HISTORY OF SOUTH ASIA AND SOUTH ASIANS MUKHARJI, MANJITA DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 4C2 MW 0330PM-0500PM If we are what we eat, then exploring the intricacies of our eating habits can reveal how each of us constitute and communicate our identities through the food we consume and do not consume.By exploring how food choices and practices symbolically create, shape and reflect particular cultures, this course will use food as the prism through which we will explore the history and culture of South Asia. Moreover, by investigating who eats what, with whom, and where, this course will examine the complex structures of social intamacy and hierarchy, friendship, kinship, selfhood and otherness that these food practices are often embedded in. Finally, by looking at the growing popularity of South Asian cuisine in the "West", this course will also critically examine how the complex interplay of food, multiculturalism and globalization has produced a highly racialized and culturally 'authentic' South Asian-ness in the western world.
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          SAST 170-401 PSYCH OF ASIAN AMERICANS KUMAR, MEETA WILLIAMS HALL 301 TR 0430PM-0600PM Using a cultural perspective, this course is intended to provide knowledge of Asian American personality, identity, and its relationship to mental well being; analyze psycho-social research pertinent to Asian Americans; and develop critical thinking skills on Asian American issues through experential learning/discussions.
          • ASAM170401
          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
          SAST 217-401 GNDR, DVLPMNT, EMPWRMNT: C.U. IN INDIA TOPICS: GENDER, DEVELOPMENT, AND EMPOWERMENT IN INDIA ROY, RAILI WILLIAMS HALL 741 T 0300PM-0430PM C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India. The 2-CU course requires: 1) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Fall term 2) A 12-Day trip to India with the instructor during the winter break to visit key sites and conduct original research (sites vary) 3) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) A research paper, due at the end of the spring term. Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the program. For more information, and the program application, go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course DEADLINE TO REGISTER IS MARCH 31st
          • SAST517401
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          SAST 217-402 GREAT MONUMENTS OF INDIA: CU IN INDIA TOPICS: GREAT MONUMENTS OF INDIA SOHONI, PUSHKAR WILLIAMS HALL 303 M 0330PM-0500PM C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India. The 2-CU course requires: 1) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Fall term 2) A 12-Day trip to India with the instructor during the winter break to visit key sites and conduct original research (sites vary) 3) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) A research paper, due at the end of the spring term. Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the program. For more information, and the program application, go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course DEADLINE TO REGISTER IS MARCH 31st
          • SAST517402
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          SAST 227-402 HINDI NATION & FRAGMENTS: The Hindi Nation and its Fragments WILLIAMS, TYLER GODDARD LAB 102 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course will trace the formation and contestation of a Hindi national publ ic during the colonial and post-colonial periods, utilizing the post-colonial critical thought of writers in English like Partha Chatterjee, Gayatri Spivak, and Aijaz Ahmed, but also of critics writing in Hindi like Namvar Singh, Ashok Vajpevi, Rajendra Yadav, etc. Attention will be given to this manner in which the contours and character of this imagined community have been debated in the context of different literary, social, and political movements, with particular emphases given to aspects of gender, caste, and regional identity. Central to class discussions will be the question of what constitutes a languager literature, and consequently what relation those concepts can have to nation in a multilingual state such as India. Readings will be in translation.
          • COML226402
          • COML535402
          • ENGL595402
          • SAST527402
          SAST 249-401 GUIDE TO SUFISM S.ASIA: RE-ENCHANTING MODERNITY - A GUIDE TO SUFISM IN SOUTH ASIA SEVEA, TERENJIT MEYERSON HALL B2 TR 0430PM-0600PM This undergraduate level course introduces students to Sufism in modern South Asia, with a particluar focus on how Muslim 'mystics' and their 'mystical' methods interacted with modernity, colonialism, technological developments and globalization. This course is divided into three parts. In the first part of this course, students are provided with an overview of the theological and historical background of the dominant expression of Islam that came to be identified as 'Sufism' or 'Islamic mysticism', the historical development of Sufi institutions and spaces in South Asia, and the historical emergence of South Asia as a prominent global center of Sufism. The second and main part of this course introduces studetns to a range of anthropological and historical works that are revelatory about how Sufi in modern South Asia were and remain intimately connected to modern political and technological developments. Providing students with an overview of Sufi re-enchantments of modernity from the 19th to 21st century, this section of the course focuses upon Sufi movements and masters who perpetuated or defended customary Islam through sophisticated appropriations of technologies and print networks, and negotiations with non-Muslim rulers and societies. Moreover, students will be introduced to anthropological and historical scholarship on religious worlds in modern South Asia that were and remain steeped in 'customary Islam' and Sufi performances and interpretations of Islam. These sources reveal how 'mystical' methods of performing Islam through ecstasy and spiritual restoration, and interpretations of dreams and visions, have regularly interacted with contemporaneous technologies. The third part of this course introduces students to the globalization of South Asian Sufism in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia. Herein, students will be encouraged to engage with anthropological and literary works pertaining to itinerant South Asian Sufi masters and their devotional cults, and introduced to active South Asian Sufi centers in Philadelphia.
          • RELS249401
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          SAST 250-401 HISTORY OF HINDUISM SREENIVASAN, RAMYA MCNEIL BUILDING 169
          WILLIAMS HALL 25
          R 0300PM-0430PM
          T 0300PM-0430PM
          This course will explore the history of the religion(s) designated by the term 'Hinduism' from their earliest articulations down to the rise of modern reforms in the nineteenth century. The study of Hinduism is perhaps unique among the scholarly traditions on world religions in that it has to date had no serious connected account of its historical development, as scholars have preferred to take structural, sociological, phenomenological, and doctrinal approaches to the religion. The course, after a brief review of scholarly approaches to Hinduism and their interpretive legacies, will seek to develop a historical sense of the religion through attention to shifts in liturgy, ritual, theology, doctrine, sacral kingship, and soteriology. The course will include the reading of primary sources relevant to understanding these changes a well as highlight both modern and premodern traditions of their interpretation. It will also consider and assess some of the key interpretive ideas in the study of Hinduism, including, Sanskritization, Great and Little Traditions, cult formation, regional and popular religious movements, and canon formation. There will also be sustained consideration of the question of religion and socio-political power as well as relations between Hinduism and other religions like Buddhism and Islam.
          • RELS251401
          SAST 252-401 MUSIC, RELIGION,& RITUAL: IN SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA SYKES, JAMES MUSIC BUILDING 102 M 0200PM-0500PM What role does music play in articulating religious identities and spaces? What is the importance of ritual musics as they persist and change in the modern world? How does music reflect and articulate religious ways of thinking and acting? In this course, we explore these and other questions about the interrelations between music, religion, and ritual in South and Southeast Asia. Focusing on India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and Indonesia, the course emphasizes musics from Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim and Christian traditions; nevertheless, it draws widely to touch upon sacred musics in Pakistan, Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, and among some indigenous peoples in the region. Throughout, we explore ontologies of sound; sonic occurrences in religious structures, public processions, and pilgrimage sites; the construction of religion and ritual as ideas forg ed through colonial encounter and modern scholarship on religion; the politics of sacred sounds in today's public spaces and contemporary media, such as television and online; and the surprising fluidity between popular and sacred musical genres.
          • ANTH242401
          • MUSC252401
          SAST 265-401 INDIAN FOLKLORE RALLAPALLI, SUNDARAM COLLEGE HALL 217 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course surveys and examines major genres, themes and analytical methods in the study of Indian Folklore. The following topics will be covered: variety in themes, literary genres, beliefs, customs, festivals, artifacts and performing arts. This is an introductory level course for students with no background of Indian Folklore. This course will also discuss the Folklore scholarship and methods of understanding the nature of Indian Folklore.
          • SAST565401
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          SAST 270-401 The Agrarian Question in Asia:A Chapter in the History of Economic Thought CHAUDHRY, FAISAL WILLIAMS HALL 201 MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course we will look at how the relationship between 'modern' industry, agriculture, and economic chnage has been undestood and acted upon in the context of the two major agrarian empire zones of Asia that now comprise the countries of China and India. Today, it is in connection to recent processes of economic liberalization, globalization, and the post-Cold War 'triumph of capitalism' that the vast changes transpiring in these areas of the world are most typically discussed. However, the anticipation of the imminent 'great transformation' of these parts of the world has a much longer history. As such, it has proven both constitutive of the processes of actual transformation that have been unfolding in these parts of the world since (at least) the second half of the nineteenth-century and representative of the multifarious idioms that have historically gone into the making of knowledge about the economic. To Asian subalterns and to the West's high theoretical exponents of classical political economy, to metropolitan romantics and to incipient "third-world" nationalists, to the early 20th-century's increasingly 'scientific' economists and to its revolutionaries - to one and all the agrarian question in Asia was crucial. For us, it will be the entrepot into thinking about the making of economics and the economy in a time before a Post-War era in which each would increasingly become the reflection of the other through a seemingly self-evident relaiton between object and inquiry and between diagnosing underdevelopment and desiring growth.
          • HIST270401
          • HIST570401
          • SAST570401
          SAST 296-401 SOCIAL NETWORKS MUKHERJEE, RAHUL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 141 MW 0330PM-0500PM This course explores an aspect of cultural studies intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
          • CINE295401
          • COML295401
          • ENGL295401
          SAST 312-401 INDIAN SCULPTURE: ICON AND NARRATIVE CANCELED Topic varies. Spring 2015: Using resources of the Philadelphia Museum of Art's exceptional collection, this workshop will explore India's remarkable traditions of sculpture produced for singular narrative and iconic ends.
            OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
            SAST 323-401 MAKING NATIONS/BREAKING NATIONS: PARTITION AND SOUTH ASIA KAUL, SUVIR FISHER-BENNETT HALL 140 W 0200PM-0500PM This course explores an aspect of Postcolonial literature intensively; specific course topics vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
            • COML378401
            • ENGL293401
            SAST 324-401 SANSKRIT LIT & POETRY: SANSKRIT LITERATURE AND POETRY PATEL, DEVEN WILLIAMS HALL 305 F 0200PM-0500PM This course will focus solely on the specific genres, themes, and aesthetics of Sanskrit literature (the hymn, the epic, the lyric, prose, drama, story literature, the sutra, etc.) and a study of the history and specific topics of Sanskrit poetics and dramaturgy. All readings will be in translation.
            • COML324401
            • COML624401
            • SAST624401
            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
            SAST 350-401 THEMES IN INDIAN PHILOS SHARMA, RAM FISHER-BENNETT HALL 323 MWF 1000AM-1100AM Topics vary. When the topic is Yoga philosophy, the following applies. Yoga is a classical school of Indian philosophy that consists of a unique metaphysics epistemology, and ethics. Yoga in the contemporary context usually refers to a system of physical and spiritual exercises that draw from this philosophy. In this course, we will read the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali in English translation from the original Sanskrit, with commentary. We will go over all central concepts, technical terms, and historical developments in the philosophy of Yoga. We will also discuss the philosophy of Hatha Yoga in the context of its historical and practical developments. No prior knowledge of Indian philosophy is required for this course.
            • SAST650401
            SAST 406-680 BEGINNING PASHTU II ADEEL, UMME F 0830AM-1130AM
            • PERS512680
            SAST 408-680 BEGINNING KANNADA II SWAMINATHAN, VIJAYALAKSHMI FISHER-BENNETT HALL 24
            FISHER-BENNETT HALL 16
            M 0500PM-0630PM
            R 0430PM-0600PM
            This is a systematic introduction to the Kannada language and culture for beginners. The course aims at developing listening and comprehension and a real life interactive speaking ability in a variety of everyday topics. The Kannada script is introduced from the beginning and the language is presented in its socio-cultural context for achieving a meaningful and operational control of the language. Students acquire basic rules for structural and socio-cultural appropriateness. Students learn vocabulary related to a variety of topics during the semester. Class activities include watching videos, role-playing, language games and group work. Evaluation is based on class participation, performance in quizzes and tests and completed assignments.
              SAST 411-680 BEGINNING MARATHI II RANADE, MILIND MCNEIL BUILDING 409 TR 1200PM-0130PM
                SAST 413-680 INTERMEDIATE MARATHI II RANADE, MILIND FISHER-BENNETT HALL 19 TR 0600PM-0730PM
                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                  SAST 426-680 INTERMEDIATE PASHTU II ADEEL, UMME WILLIAMS HALL 438 F 0200PM-0400PM
                  • PERS114680
                  • PERS514680
                  SAST 428-680 INTERMEDIATE KANNADA II SWAMINATHAN, VIJAYALAKSHMI FISHER-BENNETT HALL 24
                  FISHER-BENNETT HALL 16
                  M 0400PM-0530PM
                  R 0600PM-0700PM
                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                    SAST 446-680 ADVANCED PASHTO READINGS ADEEL, UMME UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 F 1100AM-0100PM
                      SAST 447-680 ADVC KANNADA: TPCS RALLAPALLI, SUNDARAM TBA TBA-
                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                        SAST 505-401 VISUALITY IN SOUTH ASIA MEISTER, MICHAEL CANCELED Aspects of sculpture, painting, iconography, or architecture in the Indian sub-continent. Topic varies. Spring 2015: Seeing and being seen, vocalizing and hearing, contribute to the construction of meaning in any society. Important as texts have been to South Asia's history, perceptions of the physical world dominate experieicne within South Asian cultures. This course will approach this perceptual works as expressed in art and methodsand frame art and perception as a source of knowledge.
                          OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
                          SAST 517-401 GNDR, DVLPMNT, EMPWRMNT: C.U. IN INDIA TOPICS: GENDER, DEVELOPMENT, AND EMPOWERMENT IN INDIA ROY, RAILI WILLIAMS HALL 741 T 0300PM-0430PM C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India. The 2-CU course requires: 1) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Fall term 2) A 12-Day trip to India with the instrucotrduring the winter break to visit key sites and conduct original research (sites vary) 3) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) A research paper, due at the end of the spring term. Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the program. For more information, and the program application, go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course
                          • SAST217401
                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          SAST 517-402 GREAT MONUMENTS OF INDIA: CU IN INDIA TOPICS: GREAT MONUMENTS OF INDIA SOHONI, PUSHKAR WILLIAMS HALL 303 M 0330PM-0500PM C.U. in India is a hybrid, domestic/overseas course series which provides students with the opportunity to have an applied learning and cultural experience in India. The 2-CU course requires: 1) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Fall term 2) A 12-Day trip to India with the instrucotrduring the winter break to visit key sites and conduct original research (sites vary) 3) 15 classroom hours at Penn in the Spring term and 4) A research paper, due at the end of the spring term. Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the program. For more information, and the program application, go to http://sites.sas.upenn.edu/cuinindia This is a 2-CU yearlong course
                          • SAST217402
                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          SAST 527-402 HINDI NATION & FRAGMENTS: The Hindi Nation and its Fragments WILLIAMS, TYLER GODDARD LAB 102 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course will trace the formation and contestation of a Hindi national publ ic during the colonial and post-colonial periods, utilizing the post-colonial critical thought of writers in English like Partha Chatterjee, Gayatri Spivak, and Aijaz Ahmed, but also of critics writing in Hindi like Namvar Singh, Ashok Vajpevi, Rajendra Yadav, etc. Attention will be given to this manner in which the contours and character of this imagined community have been debated in the context of different literary, social, and political movements, with particular emphases given to aspects of gender, caste, and regional identity. Central to class discussions will be the question of what constitutes a languager literature, and consequently what relation those concepts can have to nation in a multilingual state such as India. Readings will be in translation.
                          • COML226402
                          • COML535402
                          • ENGL595402
                          • SAST227402
                          SAST 541-401 Islam and the Religious Image ELIAS, JAMAL COLLEGE HALL 217 W 0200PM-0500PM This seminar explores the place of visual religious arts in Islam; we will attempt to get beyond conventional ideas regarding the im/propriety of visual representation to examine how Muslims have understood and deployed visual art in a number of historical and cultural contexts. In the process, we will explore the ways in which visuality as a process renders the act of seeing into a religious experieence. As such, we will also examine the role of the arts in relation to religion: how does vision affect the understanding and practice of religion,, and what do visual arts tell us about religion in ways that texts of speech cannot? Simultaneously, what does the study of religion tell us about visual art that art history cannot?
                          • NELC581401
                          • RELS541401
                          SAST 550-401 HISTORY OF HINDUISM ALI, DAUD WILLIAMS HALL 25
                          MCNEIL BUILDING 309
                          T 0300PM-0430PM
                          R 0300PM-0430PM
                          This course will explore the history of the religion(s) designated by the term 'Hinduism' from their earliest articulations down to the rise of modern reforms in the nineteenth century. The study of Hinduism is perhaps unique among the scholarly traditions on world religions in that it has to date had no serious connected account of its historical development, as scholars have preferred to take structural, sociological, phenomenological, and doctrinal approaches to the religion. The course, after a brief review of scholarly approaches to Hinduism and their interpretive legacies, will seek to develop a historical sense of the religion through attention to shifts in liturgy, ritual, theology, doctrine, sacral kingship, and soteriology. The course will include the reading of primary sources relevant to understanding these changes a well as highlight both modern and premodern traditions of their interpretation. It will also consider and assess some of the key interpretive ideas in the study of Hinduism, including, Sanskritization, Great and Little Traditions, cult formation, regional and popular religious movements, and canon formation. There will also be sustained consideration of the question of religion and socio-political power as well as relations between Hinduism and other religions like Buddhism and Islam.
                          • RELS551401
                          SAST 565-401 INDIAN FOLKLORE RALLAPALLI, SUNDARAM COLLEGE HALL 217 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course surveys and examines major genres, themes and amalytical methods in the study of Indian Folklore. The following topics will be covered: variety in themes, literary genres, beliefs, customs, festivals, artifacts and performing arts. This is an introductory level course for students with no background of Indian Folklore. This course will also discuss the Folklore scholarship and methods of understanding the nature of Indian Folklore.
                          • SAST265401
                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          SAST 570-401 The Agrarian Question in Asia:A Chapter in the History of Economic Thought CHAUDHRY, FAISAL WILLIAMS HALL 201 MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course we will look at how the relationship between 'modern' industry, agriculture, and economic chnage has been undestood and acted upon in the context of the two major agrarian empire zones of Asia that now comprise the countries of China and India. Today, it is in connection to recent processes of economic liberalization, globalization, and the post-Cold War 'triumph of capitalism' that the vast changes transpiring in these areas of the world are most typically discussed. However, the anticipation of the imminent 'great transformation' of these parts of the world has a much longer history. As such, it has proven both constitutive of the processes of actual transformation that have been unfolding in these parts of the world since (at least) the second half of the nineteenth-century and representative of the multifarious idioms that have historically gone into the making of knowledge about the economic. To Asian subalterns and to the West's high theoretical exponents of classical political economy, to metropolitan romantics and to incipient "third-world" nationalists, to the early 20th-century's increasingly 'scientific' economists and to its revolutionaries - to one and all the agrarian question in Asia was crucial. For us, it will be the entrepot into thinking about the making of economics and the economy in a time before a Post-War era in which each would increasingly become the reflection of the other through a seemingly self-evident relaiton between object and inquiry and between diagnosing underdevelopment and desiring growth.
                          • HIST270401
                          • HIST570401
                          • SAST270401
                          SAST 624-401 SANSKRIT LIT & POETRY: SANKRIT LITERATURE AND POETRY PATEL, DEVEN WILLIAMS HALL 305 F 0200PM-0500PM This course will focus solely on the specific genres, themes, and aesthetics of Sanskrit literature (the hymn, the epic, the lyric, prose, drama, story literature, the sutra, etc.) and a study of the history and specific topics of Sanskrit poetics and dramaturgy. All readings will be in translation.
                          • COML324401
                          • COML624401
                          • SAST324401
                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          SAST 650-401 THEMES IN INDIAN PHILOS SHARMA, RAM FISHER-BENNETT HALL 323 MWF 1000AM-1100AM Topics vary. When the topic is Yoga philosophy, the following applies. Yoga is a classical school of Indian philosophy that consists of a unique metaphysics epistemology, and ethics. Yoga in the contemporary context usually refers to a system of physical and spiritual exercises that draw from this philosophy. In this course, we will read the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali in English translation from the original Sanskrit, with commentary. We will go over all central concepts, technical terms, and historical developments in the philosophy of Yoga. We will also discuss the philosophy of Hatha Yoga in the context of its historical and practical developments. No prior knowledge of Indian philosophy is required for this course.
                          • SAST350401
                          SAST 710-301 SEM CLASS.IND.STUDIES: SEMINAR IN CLASSICAL INDIAN STUDIES SHARMA, RAM FISHER-BENNETT HALL 17 F 1100AM-0200PM
                            SAST 799-011 CANDIDACY EXAM PREP: STATE,SOCIETY & RELIGION IN MEDIEVAL & EARLY MODERN INDIA C.750-1750 ALI, DAUD TBA TBA-
                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR