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Courses for Spring 2023

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
BENG 0400-680 Intermediate Bengali Part II Haimanti Banerjee WILL 438 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course develops the student's prior knowledge of Bengali. An attempt is made to gear the syllabus to meet the specific needs of students. The focus of the course is to develop the oral and aural skills of the learner as well as improve writing skills and reading strategies. Emphasis is also laid on increasing the sociolinguistic and strategic competence of the learners so that they will be able to function in the target culture. Besides discussions on various aspects of Bengali life, students read some short literary texts in the original Bengali version. BENG5400680
BENG 5400-680 Intermediate Bengali Part II Haimanti Banerjee WILL 438 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course develops the student's prior knowledge of Bengali. An attempt is made to gear the syllabus to meet the specific needs of students. The focus of the course is to develop the oral and aural skills of the learner as well as improve writing skills and reading strategies. Emphasis is also laid on increasing the sociolinguistic and strategic competence of the learners so that they will be able to function in the target culture. Besides discussions on various aspects of Bengali life, students read some short literary texts in the original Bengali version. BENG0400680
GUJR 0200-680 Beginning Gujarati Part II Raki Desai WILL 317 MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM During the first year of Gujarati, major emphasis is placed on acquiring phonetics, grammatical patterns, and basic vocabulary. These goals are accomplished through guided drills and conversations accompanied by formal instruction on Gujarati grammar. From the outset, students are also taught the Gujarati writing system, which is used for all materials. By the end of the first year of instruction, student should be able to carry on coherent conversations on selected topics, read simple texts and compose short pieces in Gujarati. GUJR5200680
GUJR 0400-680 Intermediate Gujarati Part II Raki Desai WILL 6 MW 7:00 PM-8:29 PM This course is designed as a continuation of intermediate Gujarati I. Course objectives are to expand the mastery of sentence patterns and augment vocabulary and its usage through intensive grammar and comprehension exercises. A special emphasis will be placed on greater cultural awareness. Upon completion of this course students should be able to interact socially with added confidence and greater expressiveness. Students should also experience a great improvement in their comprehension of spoken and written language. During the second year of Gujarati, students are introduced to progressively more difficult reading selections, along with additional instructions in the formal grammar of the language. To maintain and develop oral and aural command of the language, readings are discussed in Gujarati. To develop their writing abilities, students are also expected to compose short essays on their readings. GUJR5400680
GUJR 1501-680 Advanced Gujarati II Raki Desai Comprehensive study in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehension to gain advanced knowledge of Gujarati. Instructor may use poetry and/or prose as tools to engage students while having them create their own written works. Contact instructor for details. GUJR5501680 Penn Lang Center Perm needed
GUJR 5200-680 Beginning Gujarati Part II Raki Desai WILL 317 MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM During the first year of Gujarati, major emphasis is placed on acquiring phonetics, grammatical patterns, and basic vocabulary. These goals are accomplished through guided drills and conversations accompanied by formal instruction on Gujarati grammar. From the outset, students are also taught the Gujarati writing system, which is used for all materials. By the end of the first year of instruction, student should be able to carry on coherent conversations on selected topics, read simple texts and compose short pieces in Gujarati. GUJR0200680
GUJR 5400-680 Intermediate Gujarati Part II Raki Desai WILL 6 MW 7:00 PM-8:29 PM This course is designed as a continuation of intermediate Gujarati I. Course objectives are to expand the mastery of sentence patterns and augment vocabulary and its usage through intensive grammar and comprehension exercises. A special emphasis will be placed on greater cultural awareness. Upon completion of this course students should be able to interact socially with added confidence and greater expressiveness. Students should also experience a great improvement in their comprehension of spoken and written language. During the second year of Gujarati, students are introduced to progressively more difficult reading selections, along with additional instructions in the formal grammar of the language. To maintain and develop oral and aural command of the language, readings are discussed in Gujarati. To develop their writing abilities, students are also expected to compose short essays on their readings. GUJR0400680
GUJR 5501-680 Advanced Gujarati II Raki Desai Comprehensive study in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehension to gain advanced knowledge of Gujarati. Instructor may use poetry and/or prose as tools to engage students while having them create their own written works. Contact instructor for details. GUJR1501680 Penn Lang Center Perm needed
HIND 0200-401 Beginning Hindi-Urdu Part II Joshua H. Pien GLAB 100
PSYL A30
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
Beginning Hindi-Urdu II is the second part of the first-year Hindi-Urdu sequence. In this course, students continue to learn the fundamentals of Hindi-Urdu through hands-on practice using the language. Classes are interactive and there is a strong emphasis on the acquisition of speaking skills; students also continue to improve literacy skills in the script of their choice (Hindi or Urdu – all materials are provided in both scripts). New topics include but are not limited to: future plans, recounting past events, traveling in South Asia, and navigating shopping and travel-related situations. Students will also engage with level-appropriate authentic materials from the Hindi-Urdu speaking world. After completing this course, students will be able to interact successfully with native speakers in a variety of everyday communication contexts. Beginning Hindi-Urdu II assumes one prior semester of classroom study or the equivalent proficiency. Students with some speaking ability but no reading-writing abilities may place into the course but should contact the instructor a few weeks before the beginning of the semester to ensure that this is the appropriate level. HIND5200401
HIND 0400-401 Intermediate Hindi Part II Joshua H. Pien WILL 306
BENN 401
T 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
R 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
Intermediate Hindi II is the second part of the second-year Hindi sequence. The course refines and expands students’ incoming language skills. It provides students with the tools needed to engage confidently and substantively with other Hindi speakers and with authentic materials in Hindi. Course materials include Bollywood film clips, folk tales and mythology, news media, and additional materials addressing topics of relevance in current north Indian society. The materials are carefully selected for students of this level, they engage a mix of reading and listening skills, and they present core vocabulary which students will find useful in real-world communication contexts. In-class activities emphasize speaking through structured, form-focused practice; pair and group discussions based on assigned materials; and a variety of additional engaging topics. The course assumes the prior successful completion of Intermediate Hindi I. Students who have not previously taken Hindi should contact the instructor for placement into the appropriate level. This course fulfills the College’s language requirement. HIND5400401
HIND 1500-401 Advanced Hindi Joshua H. Pien BENN 19 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This is an advanced course designed to expand students’ language abilities while also deepening their understanding of the Hindi-speaking world. The course is organized around the following three areas of focus: 1) Surveying Hindi – We survey a range of Hindi sources – literary, journalistic, contemporary, historical, print, video – that provide diverse viewpoints on the social and cultural life of South Asia and Hindi-speaking communities. 2) Situating Hindi – The course places course materials in historical context and explores Hindi's place in the language politics of South Asia. 3) Using Hindi – We devote time to understanding the linguistic structure of Hindi and its vocabulary to enable students to speak and write Hindi with greater confidence and precision. Classes are interactive. Prerequisite: Intermediate Hindi II or the equivalent proficiency. Please contact the instructor for placement. This course fulfills the College’s cross-cultural analysis requirement. Topics vary by semester and the course may be repeated for credit. Students who complete two semesters may earn a Hindi Language Certificate, which will be noted on their transcript. HIND5500401
HIND 5200-401 Beginning Hindi-Urdu Part II Joshua H. Pien PSYL A30
GLAB 100
TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
This introductory course core proficiency in Hindi-Urdu up to the intermediate level. It is designed for students with little or no prior exposure to Hindi or Urdu. The course covers all four language skills (speaking, lsitening, reading, and writing) and all three models of communication (interpersonal, presentational, interpretive). Students will develop literacy skills in the primary script of their choice (Hindi or Urdu script). All written materials will be provided in both scripts. All meetings are interactive and students acquire the language by using it in realistic contexts. Culture is embedded in the activities and is also introduced through various authentic materials. HIND0200401
HIND 5400-401 Intermediate Hindi Part II Joshua H. Pien WILL 306
BENN 401
T 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
R 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
In Intermediate Hindi the student continues to develop the four language skills, with an emphasis on real-life situations--through hearing and practicing conversation on everyday topics, reading a variety of authentic texts ranging from advertisements to short stories, watching segments of current films, and carrying out short research projects using Hindi sources. There is a strong emphasis on vocabulary development and on using contextually appropriate styles of spoken and written Hindi. HIND0400401
HIND 5500-401 Advanced Hindi Joshua H. Pien BENN 19 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Advanced Hindi aims at systematically developing higher level linguistic functions and cultural nuances. Students learn to describe, narrate and support opinions in informal and formal styles. The objective of the course is to promote a meaningful interaction with written literature and with native speakers in a socially acceptable manner in a variety of simple and complicated situations. A variety of authentic materials are used, such as short stories, plays, newspapers, magazines, videos, television and radio broadcasts, and interviews. Every semester the course materials and foci vary depending on the needs and interests of students in the class. HIND1500401
MLYM 0200-680 Beginning Malayalam Part II James N Kurichi WILL 204 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is designed to develop skills in reading, writing, and speaking. It will focus on the alphabet, basic vocabulary, nouns (cases, gender and number), verbs and their basic tenses, numerals, rules of joining words, adjectives, adverbs, and sentence structure. Guided conversation will be a part of every class. Students will receive considerable training in speaking and writing their own sentences and paragraphs. MLYM5200680
MLYM 0400-680 Intermediate Malayalam Part II James N Kurichi TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is designed to further the language skills learned in Beginning Malayalam. Direct and indirect speech, passive voice, postpositions, and rules of joining words, will be included. Reading and discussion of texts from current Malayalam literature (essays, narration, short stories, and poems) will be a major portion of the course. MLYM5400680
MLYM 1500-680 Advanced Malayalam James N Kurichi MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Reading, writing, comprehension, grammer and speaking at the advnaced level of Malayam are the objectives of this course. MLYM5500680
MLYM 5200-680 Beginning Malayalam Part II James N Kurichi WILL 204 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is designed to develop skills in reading, writing, and speaking. It will focus on the alphabet, basic vocabulary, nouns (cases, gender and number), verbs and their basic tenses, numerals, rules of joining words, adjectives, adverbs, and sentence structure. Guided conversation will be a part of every class. Students will receive considerable training in speaking and writing their own sentences and paragraphs. MLYM0200680
MLYM 5400-680 Intermediate Malayalam Part II James N Kurichi TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is designed to further the language skills learned in Beginning Malayalam. Direct and indirect speech, passive voice, postpositions, and rules of joining words, will be included. Reading and discussion of texts from current Malayalam literature (essays, narration, short stories, and poems) will be a major portion of the course. MLYM0400680
MLYM 5500-680 Advanced Malayalam James N Kurichi MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Reading, writing, comprehension, grammer and speaking at the advnaced level of Malayam are the objectives of this course. MLYM1500680
PASH 0100-680 Elementary Pashto I Zubairullah Hashimi WILL 217 MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM The first semester is focused on mastering the writing system, basic structures, and simple conversation using texts, writing samples, and numerous structure and dialogue drills.We remain within the present and future tenses only, developing vocabulary with lessons and discussions centered around greetings, family, weather, foods, and directions. Students use authentic online and textbook materials. PASH5100680
PASH 0200-680 Elementary Pashto II Zubairullah Hashimi BENN 19 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM The second semester covers more advanced structures with reinforcing drills, and begin reading longer texts of an assorted variety, mostly short stories and some news articles.The past tense is introduced, as well as longer more complex texts. Topics within simple simulated contexts (taxi, hotel, restaurant, food shopping, time, family). Short writing exercises and dictations are expected at this time, as well as simultaneous translations to and from Pashto. PASH5200680
PASH 5100-680 Elementary Pashto I Zubairullah Hashimi WILL 217 MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM The first semester is focused on mastering the writing system, basic structures, and simple conversation using texts, writing samples, and numerous structure and dialogue drills.We remain within the present and future tenses only, developing vocabulary with lessons and discussions centered around greetings, family, weather, foods, and directions. Students use authentic online and textbook materials. PASH0100680
PASH 5200-680 Elementary Pashto II Zubairullah Hashimi BENN 19 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM The second semester covers more advanced structures with reinforcing drills, and begin reading longer texts of an assorted variety, mostly short stories and some news articles.The past tense is introduced, as well as longer more complex texts. Topics within simple simulated contexts (taxi, hotel, restaurant, food shopping, time, family). Short writing exercises and dictations are expected at this time, as well as simultaneous translations to and from Pashto. PASH0200680
PUNJ 0400-680 Intermediate Punjabi Part II Amrit Gahunia BENN 19 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course is designed as a continuation of Beginning Punjabi, but can also be taken by anyone who can demonstrate a similar level in proficiency of the language. The course objectives are to expand the mastery of sentence patterns and augment vocabulary and its usage through intensive grammar review and comprehension exercises. A special emphasis will also be placed on greater cultural awareness. Upon completion of this course students should be able to interact socially with added confidence and greater expressiveness. Students should also experience a great improvement in their comprehension of the spoken and written language. PUNJ5400680
PUNJ 5400-680 Inermediate Punjabi Part II Amrit Gahunia BENN 19 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course is designed as a continuation of Beginning Punjabi, but can also be taken by anyone who can demonstrate a similar level in proficiency of the language. The course objectives are to expand the mastery of sentence patterns and augment vocabulary and its usage through intensive grammar review and comprehension exercises. A special emphasis will also be placed on greater cultural awareness. Upon completion of this course students should be able to interact socially with added confidence and greater expressiveness. Students should also experience a great improvement in their comprehension of the spoken and written language. PUNJ0400680
SAST 0003-401 History, Culture, and Religion in Early India Shaashi Ahlawat BENN 401 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course surveys the culture, religion and history of India from 2500 BCE to 1200 CE. The course examines the major cultural, religious and social factors that shaped the course of early Indian history. The following themes will be covered: the rise and fall of Harappan civilization, the "Aryan Invasion" and Vedic India, the rise of cities, states and the religions of Buddhism and Jainism, the historical context of the growth of classical Hinduism, including the Mahabharata, Ramayana and the development of the theistic temple cults of Saivism and Vaisnavism, processes of medieval agrarian expansion and cultic incorporation as well as the spread of early Indian cultural ideas in Southeast Asia. In addition to assigned secondary readings students will read select primary sources on the history of religion and culture of early India, including Vedic and Buddhist texts, Puranas and medieval temple inscriptions. Major objectives of the course will be to draw attention to India's early cultural and religious past and to assess contemporary concerns and ideologies in influencing our understanding and representation of that past. HIST0755401, RELS0003401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SAST0003401
SAST 0006-401 Hindu Mythology Deven Patel STNH AUD TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Premodern India produced some of the world's greatest myths and stories: tales of gods, goddesses, heroes, princesses, kings and lovers that continue to capture the imaginations of millions of readers and hearers. In this course, we will look closely at some of these stories especially as found in Purana-s, great compendia composed in Sanskrit, including the chief stories of the central gods of Hinduism: Visnu, Siva, and the Goddess. We will also consider the relationship between these texts and the earlier myths of the Vedas and the Indian Epics, the diversity of the narrative and mythic materials within and across different texts, and the re-imagining of these stories in the modern world. COML0006401, RELS0006401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
SAST 0007-401 Introduction to Modern South Asian Literatures Gregory Goulding
Kaustubh Naik
MCNB 285 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course will provide a wide-ranging introduction to the literatures of South Asia from roughly 1500 to the present, as well as an exploration of their histories and impact on South Asian society today. How are literary movements and individual works - along with the attitudes towards religion, society, and culture associated with them - still influential in literature, film, and popular culture? How have writers across time and language engaged with questions of caste, gender, and identity? We will read from the rich archive of South Asian writing in translation - from languages that include Braj, Urdu, Bangla, and Tamil - to consider how these literatures depict their own society while continuing to resonate across time and space. Topics of dicussion will include the Bhakti poetries of personal devotion, the literature of Dalits - formerly referred to as the Untouchables - and the ways in which literature addresses contemporary political and social problems. Students will leave this course with a sense of the contours of the literatures of South Asia as well as ways of exploring the role of these literatures in the larger world. No prior knowledge of South Asia is required; this course fulfills the cross-cultural analysis requirement, and the Arts and Letters sector requirement. COML0007401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
SAST 0063-401 East & West: A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Cultural History of the Modern World Lisa A Mitchell MCNB 150 TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered. From the role of spices in the formation of European joint stock companies circa 1600 to the contemporary cocaine trade, the course's use of both original primary sources and secondary readings written by historians and anthropologists will enable particular attention to the ways that global trade has impacted social, cultural, and political formations and practices throughout the world. ANTH0063401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
SAST 0107-001 Beginning Sitar II Jagadeesh J Gokhale WILL 812 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This is the second semester of a performance course in the North Indian sitar Students who have not taken the first semester but play any musical instrument are permitted to join. Principles of composition and improvisation will be explored in practice and supplemented by readings and listening. The class gives a group performance at the end of the semester. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SAST0107001
SAST 0110-001 Beginning Tabla II Aqeel Bhatti WILL 812 MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM A continuation of Tabla I, also open to beginning students.
SAST 0519-401 Partition and the Making of South Asia Suvir Kaul CANCELED This course explores an aspect of Postcolonial literature intensively. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. ENGL0519401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
SAST 1115-401 American Race: A Philadelphia Story (SNF Paideia Program Course) Fernando Chang-Muy
Fariha Khan
FAGN 216 M 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This course proposes an examination of race with a two-pronged approach: one that broadly links the study of race in the United States with a multi-disciplinary approach and also simultaneously situates specific conversations within the immediate location of Philadelphia, home to the University. The broad historical examination advances key concepts of race and racialization, explores key theoretical methodologies, and highlights major scholarly works. For example, students will engage with the study of race through Africana Studies, Asian American Studies, Urban Studies and through Latin American & Latinx Studies. Readings and methodologies will introduce students to critical issues in education, in literature, in sociology, and with methods in oral history, archival work, and ethnography. Most importantly, this extensive approach highlights the impact of race across multiple communities including Black Americans, immigrant populations, and communities that are marginalized to emphasize connections, relationships, and shared solidarity. Students are intellectually pushed to see the linkages and the impacts of racism across and among all Americans historically and presently. As each theme is introduced a direct example from Philadelphia will be discussed. The combination of the national discourse on race, with an intimate perspective from the City of Philadelphia, engages students both intellectually and civically. The course will be led by Fariha Khan but guest instructors with varied disciplinary backgrounds and guest speakers from local community organizations. Each instructor not only brings specific disciplinary expertise, but also varied community engagement experience. AFRC1115401, ASAM0115401, LALS0115401, URBS1150401
SAST 1117-301 Sounds of Power, Pleasure, and Resistance: Music, Media, and Performance in Modern South Asia Gianni Sievers BENN 407 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This undergraduate seminar will explore the interplay between music, media, and performance in the making of modern South Asia (c. 1750 to the present). We will study primary source materials including manuscripts, printed texts, sound recordings, films, and video-clips. What can the emergence of print and recorded sound on the subcontinent teach us about modernity? How did authors, entrepreneurs, politicians, and performers across time and space make use of new media and technologies? How did colonial rule and anti-colonial nationalism affect traditional methods of knowledge transmission and communities of hereditary performers? The class is organized along thematic fields that provide exposure to the content, history, and effects of various media and performance practices. Beginning with the function of music and dance at royal courts, we will familiarize ourselves with the transformation of North Indian Hindustani and South Indian Karnatak music under colonialism. We will pay particular attention to the multiple ways in which print, performance, and sound recording and transmission media played a role in the development of colonial institutions, nationalist mass movements, and cultural identities on the subcontinent. We will look at the realm of commerce and technology to explore the impact of lithographic print, the gramophone, the radio, and film on the development of knowledge and the shaping of colonial power and anti-colonial resistance. Finally, we will reflect on new modes of media consumption in the post-colonial nation states of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka, and what they tell us about contemporary narratives of South Asian history.
SAST 1148-001 Religious Literatures of India Mahboob Ali Mohammad PSYL C41 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Beginning with the classical times until now, Indian religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam and Christianity have a connected history with various literary forms such as poetry and prose narrative. Why and how Indian literatures and religious share a similar history of such an influential narrative tradition? Focusing on this primary question, we study the intersections of religions and literartures of India in classical, pre-modern and contemporary times. Throughout the course, we read several literary texts and learn to interpret and compare diverse literary practices that define the religions of India. Most importantly, we try to capture the contours of the Indian religious writing articulated in multiple settings and many variations that include hymns, chants, epic verses, bhajans and prose narratives along with contemporary literary practices that deal with class, caste, and gender discourses. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SAST1148001
SAST 1400-401 Asian American Gender and Sexualities Rupa Pillai PSYL A30 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course explores the intersection of gender, sexuality, and race in Asian America. Through interdisciplinary and cultural texts, students will consider how Asian American gender and sexualities are constructed in relation to racism while learning theories on and methods to study gender, sex, and race. We will discuss masculinities, femininities, race-conscious feminisms, LGBTQ+ identities, interracial and intraracial relationships, and kinship structures. ASAM1400401, GSWS1400401
SAST 1430-401 Introduction to Islam Abdul M Bhat COHN 204 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is an introduction to Islam as a religion as it exists in societies of the past as well as the present. It explores the many ways in which Muslims have interpreted and put into practice the prophetic message of Muhammad through historical and social analyses of varying theological, philosophical, legal, political, mystical and literary writings, as well as through visual art and music. The aim of the course is to develop a framework for explaining the sources and symbols through which specific experiences and understandings have been signified as Islamic, both by Muslims and by other peoples with whom they have come into contact, with particular emphasis given to issues of gender, religious violence and changes in beliefs and behaviors which have special relevance for contemporary society. NELC0550401, RELS1430401
SAST 2219-401 Social Inequalities: Caste and Race Rupali Bansode BENN 20 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course introduces students to two systems of inequity, caste in South Asia, particularly in India, and race in the United States. It’s main objective is to demonstrate how these modes of inequity, sometimes dismissed as outdated or irrelevant, continue to shape social and state institutions like family, law, and bureaucracy. The course will explore sociological literature on caste and race and examine how these systems existed in a range of historical contexts. It will examine how certain groups were recipients of economic, political, and social privilege, and how these groups othered communities such as Afro-Americans in the United States and Dalits in India. We will consider how privileged groups continue to represent modern institutions like state and law that fail to protect disadvantaged communities in both India and the United States. The course will also explore how privileged communities employ the tool of gendered violence of different kinds like physical violence against men and sexual violence against women of Afro-American communities and Dalit communities to maintain forms of social power and control. The final unit of the course will deal with the emerging and imagined solidarities between Afro-American social and political movements in the United States and Dalit movements in India. AFRC2219401, GSWS2219401, SOCI2970401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SAST2219401
SAST 2239-401 Adivasis/Indigenous Peoples & British Colonialism in India Bhangya Bhukya MUSE 329 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Modern Western colonialism impacted the world in many ways. However, each country and community has had a different encounter and experience with colonialism. For the Adivasis (indigenous peoples) of India, it was catastrophic and marked a new phase in their history. The pre-colonial symbolizes a period of freedom in the hills and forest, whereas the colonial era symbolizes state coercion, eviction from land and the end of free movement in the forest. The proposed course discusses Adivasis' encounters with the British colonial state. The course examines Indian history from the perspectives of Adivasis and contrasts these with dominant paradigms of Indian history. In this way, the course allows students to understand India from a different perspective. Under British colonialism, the diverse ethnic self-governing communities were imagined as primitive, uncivilized, barbaric, violent, backward and childlike people. The course discusses how such constructions impacted Adivasi social life and development. It traces how the expansion of the colonial state in forests and hills put an end to self-rule and induced massive migration from the plains of India and asks how Adivasi areas were integrated into the colonial economy. How did the colonial state use revenue and forest policies and regulations to bring these areas under its control? How did commercialization of agriculture and forest conservation work to further marginalize Adivasis? The course also examines how Adivasi knowledge of cultivation and forest conservation were viewed by the colonial state and asks why the colonial state encouraged caste-Hindu peasant migration into Adivasi areas. Finally, it traces the ways that colonial intervention has resulted in a series of contestations, acts of resistance, and insurgencies by Adivasi groups? Tracing forms of Adivasi resistance, the course puts these into conversation with intellectual history, emphasizing the role of rumours, myths, and orality, which provided the basis for the new insurgent consciousness that spread throughout Adivasi communities. Adivasi resistance movements have been documented and analyzed by colonial rulers and anthropologists. Colonial discourses were successful in criminalizing Adivasi politics. Ironically, many colonial-era discourses concerning Adivasis have been perpetuated within the post-colonial academy. The anti-colonial struggles of Adivasis were constructed as sporadic, spontaneous, unorganized and apolitical. The inauguration of the Subaltern Studies Project has reversed such arguments and attempted to provide ideological integrity to Adivasi politics. Students will be introduced to important literature on Adivasi anti-colonial insurgent consciousness and will be encouraged to think critically about the concepts and theories of subaltern politics. Assigned readings include texts by James Scott, Ranajit Guha, David Arnold, David Hardiman, Ajay Skaria, Dhanagare, Ramachandra Guha, Biswamoy Pati, Alpa Shah, Crispin Bates, Jangkhomang Guite and Bhangya Bhukya. One aim of the course is to sensitize the students to how the political and cultural mobilizations by subalterns have contributed to the shaping of democracy. ANTH2109401, ANTH5239401, HIST0853401, SAST5239401, SOCI2974401
SAST 2462-001 Urdu Topics Course Mustafa A Menai WILL 219 MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Urdu literature in translation. Topics vary by semester.
SAST 2551-401 Media and Religion Megan E Robb COHN 204 M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course will look at the ways that religion intersects with media in South Asia-- exploring how the medium is the message. The class begins with a discussion of how it is difficult to define "religion" and "media" in the Global South, specifically in South Asia. We will analyze how religion and media are inextricable, and also how news media has gone about the business of turning religion into news. The class will familiarize students with a variety of media forms aside from the obvious sources of internet, TV and newspaper-- these include traditional architecture, devotional texts, devotional poetry, music, visual-sensorial worship, modern film, recorded music, clothing, and live performance. We will conclude with a look at religion in forms of contemporary media, with particular attention to new media (TV, radio, internet). The course also offers students lectures providing a foundation of knowledge on a few of the primary religious traditions that will be central to the regions under discussion: Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, Jainism, Zoroastrianism, and Christianity. There will be guest speakers and a visit to Penn Museum. While much of the course will be immersed in the history and the past, we will conclude by considering contemporary contexts, both globalized and local. There is no prerequisite for the course. All students are welcome. RELS2550401
SAST 2610-401 The Asian Caribbean Rupa Pillai FAGN 214 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Although Asians have lived in the Americas for centuries, the Asian American community and experience tends to be defined by the post-1965 wave of immigration to the United States. In an effort to correct this narrative this course will explore the histories, experiences, and contributions of some of the forgotten Asians of the Americas. In particular, we will focus on the earlier labor migrations of Chinese and South Asian individuals to the Caribbean and the United States. The experiences of these individuals, who built railroads, cut sugarcane, and replaced African slave labor, complicate our understandings of race today. By examining the legal and social debates surrounding their labor in the 19th century and exploring how their experiences are forgotten and their descendants are rendered invisible today, we will complicate what is Asian America and consider how this history shapes immigration policies today. ASAM2610401, GSWS2610401, LALS2601401
SAST 3120-401 Indian Painting, 1100-Now Sonal Khullar JAFF 113 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This seminar addresses topics in the art of India from antiquity to the present emphasizing global connections and comparisons. Topics vary from year to year and might include the arts of the book in South Asia; Indian painting, 1100-now; history and theory of museums in the colony, 1750-1950; photography, cinema, and performance art in South Asia; and art, ecology, and environment in South Asia. We shall explore objects in area collections and incorporate special excursions and programs when possible. A background in South Asian studies or languages is not required. Students from related disciplines such history, anthropology, literary studies, religious studies, feminist studies, cinema and media studies, and architecture are welcome. ARTH3120401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SAST3120401
SAST 5239-401 Adivasis/Indigenous Peoples & British Colonialism in India Bhangya Bhukya MUSE 329 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Modern Western colonialism impacted the world in many ways. However, each country and community has had a different encounter and experience with colonialism. For the Adivasis (indigenous peoples) of India, it was catastrophic and marked a new phase in their history. The pre-colonial symbolizes a period of freedom in the hills and forest, whereas the colonial era symbolizes state coercion, eviction from land and the end of free movement in the forest. The proposed course discusses Adivasis' encounters with the British colonial state. The course examines Indian history from the perspectives of Adivasis and contrasts these with dominant paradigms of Indian history. In this way, the course allows students to understand India from a different perspective. Under British colonialism, the diverse ethnic self-governing communities were imagined as primitive, uncivilized, barbaric, violent, backward and childlike people. The course discusses how such constructions impacted Adivasi social life and development. It traces how the expansion of the colonial state in forests and hills put an end to self-rule and induced massive migration from the plains of India and asks how Adivasi areas were integrated into the colonial economy. How did the colonial state use revenue and forest policies and regulations to bring these areas under its control? How did commercialization of agriculture and forest conservation work to further marginalize Adivasis? The course also examines how Adivasi knowledge of cultivation and forest conservation were viewed by the colonial state and asks why the colonial state encouraged caste-Hindu peasant migration into Adivasi areas. Finally, it traces the ways that colonial intervention has resulted in a series of contestations, acts of resistance, and insurgencies by Adivasi groups? Tracing forms of Adivasi resistance, the course puts these into conversation with intellectual history, emphasizing the role of rumours, myths, and orality, which provided the basis for the new insurgent consciousness that spread throughout Adivasi communities. Adivasi resistance movements have been documented and analyzed by colonial rulers and anthropologists. Colonial discourses were successful in criminalizing Adivasi politics. Ironically, many colonial-era discourses concerning Adivasis have been perpetuated within the post-colonial academy. The anti-colonial struggles of Adivasis were constructed as sporadic, spontaneous, unorganized and apolitical. The inauguration of the Subaltern Studies Project has reversed such arguments and attempted to provide ideological integrity to Adivasi politics. Students will be introduced to important literature on Adivasi anti-colonial insurgent consciousness and will be encouraged to think critically about the concepts and theories of subaltern politics. Assigned readings include texts by James Scott, Ranajit Guha, David Arnold, David Hardiman, Ajay Skaria, Dhanagare, Ramachandra Guha, Biswamoy Pati, Alpa Shah, Crispin Bates, Jangkhomang Guite and Bhangya Bhukya. One aim of the course is to sensitize the students to how the political and cultural mobilizations by subalterns have contributed to the shaping of democracy. Course Requirements: Short writing responses to readings In-class presentations on readings Midterm short essay Final research paper based on primary and secondary sources. (No exams) Instructor's Objectives: 1. Students will understand indigenous perspectives on Indian culture and history 2. Students will be able to situate indigenous movements in relation to Subaltern Studies, dominant schools of historiography, and colonial and postcolonial ethnography 3. Students will be able to analyze primary sources and identify different schools of thought within secondary literature 4. Students will be able to analyze the impact of colonial practices and discourses on indigenous cultures, histories and practices, and the forms of resistan ANTH2109401, ANTH5239401, HIST0853401, SAST2239401, SOCI2974401
SAST 6626-401 South Asian Modernisms: Literature, History, Theory Gregory Goulding BENN 244 T 3:30 PM-6:29 PM This course will take up recent scholarship in modernist studies, with a particular focus on literary cultures that were not part of the canonical modernism of the early twentieth century. The course deals both with definitions of modernism, as well as with key moments and case studies of literature. Is modernism single or multiple? How does modernism relate to realism, both at the level form as well as in literary history? What were the politics of modernist literature, especially in the context of the Cold War and the emergence of the Third World? What are the stakes of a temporal and geographic expansion of modernism beyond an early-twentieth century Euro-American modernism of the metropole, to include the literatures of the 1950s and beyond, as well as those of the formerly colonized world? Is the framework of modernism still useful today, or has it become, paradoxically, both too restricted and too diffuse? We will examine literatures in multiple geographic spaces, taking South Asia as an exemplary location and expanding to other contexts. Readings in English and in translation will include both major works of secondary literature, as well as primary texts as relevant. Possible reading clusters include the multiple literatures straddling symbolism, romanticism, and modernism of writers such as Rubén Darío and Rabindranath Tagore; the linguistic tension shared by Yi Sang N. M. Rashed, and Arun Kolatkar; and the Cold War literary debates that took place across the Third World, as seen in the works of Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, Bhalchandra Nemade, and O.V. Vijayan. No proficiency in languages other than English is required or expected; however, when possible we will refer to texts in their original language. COML6626401
SAST 7307-401 Intellectual Histories of South Asia in Global Context: Genealogies of the Present Lisa A Mitchell BENN 222 F 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This graduate seminar explores intellectual histories of contemporary South Asia. Readings will trace selected literary, cultural, political, religious, and linguistic genealogies that have shaped present-day understandings, practices, alliances and categories of thought in South Asia. Particular attention will be placed on 19th and 20th century global influences and interactions, including with England, Ireland, Germany, the Soviet Union/Russia, Turkey and the Arab World, East and Southeast Asia, the United States, and Africa. Topics will including histories of mapping and census efforts, publishing projects (including those funded by the Soviet Union and the United States), international conferences (e.g., the 1893 World's Parliament of Religions at the World's Fair in Chicago, 1955 Bandung Conference, the 2009 Durban Conference), technological influences and exchanges, and educational institutions and practices. The course will also include discussions of methods for carrying out intellectual history projects and would therefore be of use for students conducting research in other regions of the world. ANTH7307001
SKRT 0200-401 Sanskrit 1st Year Part II Kashi Gomez WILL 217 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM During the first semester of beginning Sanskrit, students will be introduced to the script, phonetics, and grammar of the Sanskrit language. By the end of the semester they will be able to begin to read Sanskrit texts and compose Sanskrit sentences in addition to carrying out simple conversation. They will build the requisite skills to read, by the second semester, simple inscriptions and sections from texts like the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Bhagavad Gita, Pancatantra, and Yoga Sutra. Students will also be introduced to many features of Sanskrit culture. SKRT5200401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SKRT0200401
SKRT 0400-401 Intermediate Sanskrit Part II Kashi Gomez OTHR IP This course will lead students to consolidate their knowledge of Sanskrit grammar and increase their familiarity with Sanskrit literature of all kinds, including epic, literary, philosophical, and narrative genres of texts. It will also introduce students to the study and reading of inscriptional materials. SKRT5400401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SKRT0400401
SKRT 1000-401 Readings in Sanskrit Literature Kashi Gomez OTHR IP WF 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course is for advanced students of Sanskrit. Designed as a seminar, the course aims to take students through the primary and secondary sources of Sanskrit literary and phlosophical production. Each semester will focus on a different genre: epic, belles-lettres, lyric poetry, drama, philosophy, shastra, advanced grammar, history, poetics, and epigraphy. We will focus on original sources, secondary scholarship, and theoretical approaches toward the translation and study of Sanskrit texts. SKRT6000401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SKRT1000401
SKRT 5200-401 Sanskrit 1st Year Part II Kashi Gomez WILL 217 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM During the first semester of beginning Sanskrit, students will be introduced to the script, phonetics, and grammar of the Sanskrit language. By the end of the semester they will be able to begin to read Sanskrit texts and compose Sanskrit sentences in addition to carrying out simple conversation. They will build the requisite skills to read, by the second semester, simple inscriptions and sections from texts like the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Bhagavad Gita, Pancatantra, and Yoga Sutra. Students will also be introduced to many features of Sanskrit culture. SKRT0200401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SKRT5200401
SKRT 5400-401 Intermediate Sanskrit Part II Kashi Gomez OTHR IP This course will lead students to consolidate their knowledge of Sanskrit grammar and increase their familiarity with Sanskrit literature of all kinds, including epic, literary, philosophical, and narrative genres of texts. It will also introduce students to the study and reading of inscriptional materials. SKRT0400401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SKRT5400401
SKRT 6000-401 Readings in Sanskrit Literature Kashi Gomez OTHR IP WF 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course is for advanced students of Sanskrit. Designed as a seminar, the course aims to take students through the primary and secondary sources of Sanskrit literary and phlosophical production. Each semester will focus on a different genre: epic, belles-lettres, lyric poetry, drama, philosophy, shastra, advanced grammar, history, poetics, and epigraphy. We will focus on original sources, secondary scholarship, and theoretical approaches toward the translation and study of Sanskrit texts. SKRT1000401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=SKRT6000401
TAML 0200-680 Beginning Tamil Part II Vasu Renganathan WILL 633 MW 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course is a continuation of the Beginner Tamil TAMIL406. It continues to teach grammar and spoken sill from semester I. Lessons in the class will be based on a set of Tamil learning lessons and videos made available at http://www.southasia.upenn.edu/tamil and the book by the Instructor titled "Tamil Language in Context", information available at http://www.thetamillanguage.com. By the end of the semester, students will have a working knowledge in reading Tamil text with a basic skill to write and speak the language at ACTFL's Beginner High level. TAML5200680
TAML 0400-680 Intermediate Tamil Part II Vasu Renganathan WILL 28 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is a continuation of Intermediate Tamil I (TAMIL426) and it continue to develop the skills obtained either from the Beginning Tamil course or from students' prior exposure to Tamil by other means. The emphasis will be on using the language in actual environments both in spoken medium and in written medium. Multimedia materials such as audio and videos as provided in the website http://www.southasia.upenn.edu/tamil or http://www.thetamillanguage.com will be extensively used to provide students an exposure to the Tamil culture and customs as authentic as possible. Besides improving their speech and writing, students will also be introduced gradually to Tamil literature, which has two thousand years of literary history. By the end of this course, students will have ACTFL's intermediate high proficiency level. TAML5400680
TAML 1600-680 Readings Classical Tamil Vasu Renganathan WILL 28 TR 7:00 PM-8:29 PM This course is an introduction to Tamil literary works produced between the 3rd century BC and 4th century AD prior to bhakti literature which evolved from about the 6th century AD onwards with a specific focus on divinity and religious themes. Classical Tamil, in comparison to bhakti literature, is secular in nature and is devoid of any religious themes. We will read selected poems from the three major divisions of classical Tamil poems namely the eight anthologies, ten songs, and the five epics, and attempt to discuss how the three major themes namely Aham, Puram, and Didactics play a role in them. While the Aham works concentrate on love poems, ethics of love life, moods of the heroes and heroines, the other varieties of poems mainly discuss the political and moral lives of the Tamils. Even though knowledge of Tamil script and some grammar of Tamil would help understand the readings well, no prior knowledge of script and grammar is essential to take this course. We will read the poems in romanized script with English translations and attempt to illustrate the poems in English. Students will be required to write a number of short essays and a final long essay, either in Tamil or in English with transliterations with a research topic based on what is discussed in class. TAML5600680
TAML 5200-680 Beginning Tamil Part II Vasu Renganathan WILL 633 MW 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course is a continuation of the Beginner Tamil TAMIL406. It continues to teach grammar and spoken sill from semester I. Lessons in the class will be based on a set of Tamil learning lessons and videos made available at http://www.southasia.upenn.edu/tamil and the book by the Instructor titled "Tamil Language in Context", information available at http://www.thetamillanguage.com. By the end of the semester, students will have a working knowledge in reading Tamil text with a basic skill to write and speak the language at ACTFL's Beginner High level. TAML0200680
TAML 5400-680 Intermediate Tamil Part II Vasu Renganathan WILL 28 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is a continuation of Intermediate Tamil I (TAMIL426) and it continue to develop the skills obtained either from the Beginning Tamil course or from students' prior exposure to Tamil by other means. The emphasis will be on using the language in actual environments both in spoken medium and in written medium. Multimedia materials such as audio and videos as provided in the website http://www.southasia.upenn.edu/tamil or http://www.thetamillanguage.com will be extensively used to provide students an exposure to the Tamil culture and customs as authentic as possible. Besides improving their speech and writing, students will also be introduced gradually to Tamil literature, which has two thousand years of literary history. By the end of this course, students will have ACTFL's intermediate high proficiency level. TAML0400680
TAML 5600-680 Readings Classical Tamil Vasu Renganathan WILL 28 TR 7:00 PM-8:29 PM This course is an introduction to Tamil literary works produced between the 3rd century BC and 4th century AD prior to bhakti literature which evolved from about the 6th century AD onwards with a specific focus on divinity and religious themes. Classical Tamil, in comparison to bhakti literature, is secular in nature and is devoid of any religious themes. We will read selected poems from the three major divisions of classical Tamil poems namely the eight anthologies, ten songs, and the five epics, and attempt to discuss how the three major themes namely Aham, Puram, and Didactics play a role in them. While the Aham works concentrate on love poems, ethics of love life, moods of the heroes and heroines, the other varieties of poems mainly discuss the political and moral lives of the Tamils.Even though knowledge of Tamil script and some grammar of Tamil would help understand the readings well, no prior knowledge of script and grammar is essential to take this course. We will read the poems in romanized script with English translations and attempt to illustrate the poems in English.Students will be required to write a number of short essays and a final long essay, either in Tamil or in English with transliterations with a research topic based on what is discussed in class. TAML1600680
TELU 0200-401 Beginning Telugu Part II Mahboob Ali Mohammad This course continues tudents to the basic Telugu language skills, with an emphasis on practice for listening comprehension, and speaking Telugu. Combined with exposure to Andhra culture, the classroom and online work in this course will enable interested students to pursue further language study in Telugu at the intermediate level, to carry out field research in Andhra Pradesh, or to prepare them to advanced work in Telugu Studies. An introduction to Telugu like this will also be useful for students who just want to acquire basic Telugu language skills for learning a new language or being able to communicate with Telugu speaking family and friends or to enjoy Telugu music and films. TELU5200401
TELU 0400-401 Intermediate Telugu Part II Mahboob Ali Mohammad This course is designed to expand the students' basic language skills in Telugu in order to allow them to function adequately in a Telugu-speaking environment, to immerse themselves in the rich Andhra culture, and to accomplish a more advanced competency in an interesting foreign language. This course is also aimed at students planning to conduct scholarly research in Telugu history, literature or society, or humanities or social science fieldwork in Telugu speaking areas. TELU5400401
TELU 1500-001 Advanced Telugu Mahboob Ali Mohammad This is a course designed for students who have completed four semesters of Telugu.
TELU 5200-401 Beginning Telugu Part II Mahboob Ali Mohammad This course continues tudents to the basic Telugu language skills, with an emphasis on practice for listening comprehension, and speaking Telugu. Combined with exposure to Andhra culture, the classroom and online work in this course will enable interested students to pursue further language study in Telugu at the intermediate level, to carry out field research in Andhra Pradesh, or to prepare them to advanced work in Telugu Studies. An introduction to Telugu like this will also be useful for students who just want to acquire basic Telugu language skills for learning a new language or being able to communicate with Telugu speaking family and friends or to enjoy Telugu music and films. TELU0200401
TELU 5400-401 Intermediate Telugu Part II Mahboob Ali Mohammad This course is designed to expand the students' basic language skills in Telugu in order to allow them to function adequately in a Telugu-speaking environment, to immerse themselves in the rich Andhra culture, and to accomplish a more advanced competency in an interesting foreign language. This course is also aimed at students planning to conduct scholarly research in Telugu history, literature or society, or humanities or social science fieldwork in Telugu speaking areas. TELU0400401
URDU 0400-401 Intermediate Urdu Part II Mustafa A Menai BENN 244 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This continuing second-year course allows students to continue improving their Urdu proficiency while also gaining a broad foundational understanding of Urdu society and culture throughout South Asia. The course provides students the tools needed to handle a variety of authentic written and spoken Urdu sources including film, music, media reports, folk tales, and simple literature. Students will also continue to increase their speaking and writing proficiency to be able to discuss a broad range of concrete, real-world topics. The course is designed for students with one year of previous Urdu or Hindi study or the equivalent proficiency. URDU5400401
URDU 1500-401 Advanced Urdu: Language and Literature Mustafa A Menai BENN 19 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course is designed to give in-depth exposure to some of the finest works of classical and modern Urdu prose and poetry along with the historical and socio-political trends they represent. Figures covered range from Ghalib (b.1797) to Faiz, Fehmida Riaz, and post 9/11 Urdu prose and poetry. The course is open to both undergraduates and graduate students, subject to having intermediate level proficiency. The course is repeatable, and hte content changes every semester. Multi-media content such as music, videos, blogs etc. will be actively incorporated. Every effort will be made to accommidate individual interests. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor with any questions, or if they are unsure about eligibility. URDU5500401
URDU 5400-401 Intermediate Urdu Part II Mustafa A Menai BENN 244 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This continuing second-year course allows students to continue improving their Urdu proficiency while also gaining a broad foundational understanding of Urdu society and culture throughout South Asia. The course provides students the tools needed to handle a variety of authentic written and spoken Urdu sources including film, music, media reports, folk tales, and simple literature. Students will also continue to increase their speaking and writing proficiency to be able to discuss a broad range of concrete, real-world topics. The course is designed for students with one year of previous Urdu or Hindi study or the equivalent proficiency. URDU0400401
URDU 5500-401 Advanced Urdu: Language and Literature Mustafa A Menai BENN 19 MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course is designed to give in-depth exposure to some of the finest works of classical and modern Urdu prose and poetry along with the historical and socio-political trends they represent. Figures covered range from Ghalib (b.1797) to Faiz, Fehmida Riaz, and post 9/11 Urdu prose and poetry. The course is open to both undergraduates and graduate students, subject to having intermediate level proficiency. The course is repeatable, and hte content changes every semester. Multi-media content such as music, videos, blogs etc. will be actively incorporated. Every effort will be made to accommidate individual interests. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor with any questions, or if they are unsure about eligibility. URDU1500401